Tagged with "ace"
This month's celebrity pick is the awesome actress Tracee Ellis Ross
Category: Celebrity Pick
Tags: tracee ellis ross celebrity pick word life production new quality entertainment

The daughter of Diana Ross, Tracee Ellis Ross was born in Los Angeles in October 1972. After college, Ross worked in the magazine industry, which led her to modeling and subsequently acting. She got her first big acting break with a role on the TV series Girlfriends, which ran from 2000 until 2008. After appearing on several other shows and in movies, in 2014 Ross landed another starring role in the series Black-ish. The show has been a success and weekly showcase for the actress's talents.

Early Years

Tracee Ellis Ross was born on October 29, 1972, in Los Angeles, California, to legendary Motown singer Diana Ross and music manager Robert Ellis Silberstein. She attended Brown University (where she was friends with singer-songwriter Duncan Sheik) and earned a bachelor’s degree in theater arts in 1994.

After graduation, Ross began working in the fashion industry as an editor for magazines such as Mirabella and New York, and the exposure to the industry helped her segue into modeling. Ross was featured in many magazines, landing on the cover of Essence and Jet, among others, and posing for such luminaries as Herb Ritts and Francesco Scavullo.

Early Acting Roles and ‘Girlfriends’

Ross soon made a transition into acting, and the late 1990s saw her land roles in a string of movies, including Far Harbor (1996, her debut), Sue (1997) and A Fare to Remember (1999). She also took on hosting duties of the Lifetime talk show The Dish for a year (1997) and appeared in a few more movies at the turn of the century, including Hanging Up and In the Weeds, both in 2000.

That would also be the year Ross caught her big break and got a real taste of success, snagging the part of Joan Clayton on the TV series Girlfriends. The sitcom was a success, and the weekly exposure helped Ross get more movie parts. But TV would become her focus, and Girlfriends kept her busy for nearly the entire decade across more than 170 episodes.

Besides being a ratings hit and launch pad for Ross’s career, Girlfriends brought a slew of critical attention to the actress's doorstep in the form of seven NAACP Image Award nominations and two wins (2007 and 2009, both for Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series) and a BET Comedy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series (2005). In the midst of Girlfriends’s long run, Ross managed to squeeze in some film work as well, including Tyler Perry’s Daddy’s Little Girls (2007), with Idris Elba and Gabrielle Union, and Labor Pains, featuring Lindsay Lohan (2011).

Hit Show 'Black-ish'

After Girlfriends came to an end in 2008, Ross worked on other series, such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, appearing in a handful of episodes, and BET’s Reed Between the Lines, on which she starred opposite Malcolm Jamal Warner in 2011.

In 2014, Ross began a new gig as one of the stars of the ABC prime time comedy Black-ish, which became a hit and gave her yet another high-profile role. In the show she plays successful physician Dr. Rainbow Johnson opposite Anthony Anderson, who plays her husband "Dre." The two are parents of four children in an upper-class African-American family. Laurence Fishburne also stars in the series as Ross's father-in-law.

Additional Projects

Multidimensional, Ross has kept busy in other venues when not working on her series. She appeared in the 2011 short film anthology Five on Lifetime, a project which focused on breast cancer awareness, and in New York and Los Angeles stage productions of Love, Loss, and What I Wore; co-hosted Black Girls Rock, a BET awards show, in 2013; and was featured in two Kanye West videos: The New Workout Plan (2004) and Touch the Sky (2006).

Ross has also entered the motivational speaker realm, teaching a workshop called “Tapping Into Your Creative Well,” and is active with Aviva Family and Children Services in Los Angeles and the national program Big Brother Big Sister. For her efforts, Ross has been honored by the Los Angeles Urban League as Volunteer of the Year.

Source: Biography.com

Masta Ace is considered to be a highly skilled and influential MC
Category: Classic Hip Hop
Tags: masta ace classic hip hop word life production new quality entertainment

Duval Clear known better by his stage name Masta Ace, is an American rapper and record producer from Brownsville, Brooklyn. He appeared on the classic 1988 Juice Crew posse cut "The Symphony". He is noted for his distinct voice, rapping proficiency and for influencing several MCs, including Eminem.

Clear graduated from the University of Rhode Island in 1988, after meeting Marley Marl in 1987 during his summer break.[6] Ace made his recording debut as on the Hip Hop posse-cut "The Symphony", along with fellow Juice Crew members Craig G, Kool G Rap and Big Daddy Kane, released on Marley Marl's In Control album. The album also featured two additional Ace tracks, "Keep Your Eyes on the Prize" and "Simon Says". In 1989, he released his first solo single, "Together" b/w "Letter to the Better". His debut album, Take a Look Around, was released through Marl's Cold Chillin' label in 1990, featuring production from Marl and DJ Mister Cee. The album featured two minor hit singles in "Music Man" and "Me & The Biz", the latter being a track with Ace's impersonation of Biz Markie, rather than a duet as previously thought the song would be.

In the early stages of his career, Masta Ace was very energetic (cf. "Jeepbutt Niguh", where, tongue-in-cheek, he taunts police officers for their knee-jerk predisposition to harass black youth on city streets.) He also recorded material with a six-member supporting entourage, Masta Ace Incorporated. In light of his newly claimed status as a veteran, he has gravitated toward an earnest, matter-of-fact plainspokenness in the new millennium. Many of the songs that have lent newfound heft to his reputation are simple, no-nonsense rumination on feelings and facts of urban American life, including "Soda and Soap" and "Beautiful".

During the years between his debut and his second album, Ace began having bitter feelings toward the commercial state of hip hop music, as well as the prominence of Gangsta rap, feelings which ruled the content on his second release, 1993's SlaughtaHouse, with the loose concept of the album seeing Ace taking the fake "gangsta emcees" to his "SlaughtaHouse". The album featured Ace's new crew, Masta Ace Incorporated, which included Eyceurokk, Lord Digga, Paula Perry and R&B vocalist Leschea. The singles "SlaughtaHouse", "Saturday Nite Live", "Style Wars" and "Jeep Ass Niguh" were taken from the album. The latter featured an unlisted remix titled "Born to Roll", which became a crossover single in 1994, peaking at #23 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. In the same year, Ace became a member of a temporary crew Crooklyn Dodgers, formed for the release of Spike Lee's movie, Crooklyn, along with MC's Special Ed and Buckshot of Black Moon, and recorded the title track of the album soundtrack. The song became Ace's second Hot 100 hit in 1994, peaking at #60 on the chart.

Ace furthered his mainstream appeal in 1995, with his radio-friendly Sittin' on Chrome album. This effort was also released with the Masta Ace Incorporated crew, now also known as The I.N.C. The album was Ace's most commercially successful release, breaking into the Top 20 on Billboard's Top R&B/Hip Hop Albums chart. Sittin' On Chrome included "Born to Roll", as well as two other Hot 100 hit singles, "The I.N.C. Ride" and "Sittin' on Chrome". Following the album's success, Ace had a falling out with I.N.C. members Lord Digga and Paula Perry, leading to the breakup of the crew. After the split, Ace was largely missing from the hip hop scene over the next five years, save for a number of random vinyl singles. During his vinyl days, he bounced from a number of labels, releasing his "Cars" single on Tape Kingz Records, his "Yeah Yeah Yeah" and "NFL" singles on the Union Label, his "NY Confidential" single on Replay Records, his "Express Delivery" single on Three Sixty Records, his "Spread It Out/Hellbound" single on Yosumi Records, his "Conflict" single on Mona Records, his "Ghetto Like" single on Fat Beats, his "So Now U A MC" single on Bad Magic Records, and his "Brooklyn Blocks" single on Buckshot's Duck Down Records.

Ace's "Ghetto Like" single led to a misunderstanding with an underground emcee named Boogieman, who released a somewhat similar single titled "Ghetto Love" which was released on 420recordings not long before. He thought that Ace was "biting" his track and released a diss song toward Ace titled "Just You Wait". Ace responded to Boogieman on the diss track "Acknowledge", which also dissed The High & Mighty over a misunderstanding. The trading of records led to a rap battle between the two at a Lyricist Lounge event. "Acknowledge" was also included on "Disposable Arts."[1] Masta Ace can also be found performing numerous "Dubtitled" voice overs on the television series titled "Kung Faux" seen in 150+ countries worldwide.

 

Disposable Arts became one of the most acclaimed underground hip hop releases of 2001, beloved for its pure hip hop style and clever album concept, which served as a fictional story, chronicling Ace's time spent at a satirical rap school named the "Institute of Disposable Arts". JCOR Records folded soon after the release, leaving it out-of-print, until being re-released in 2005 on Ace's self-established M3 label. The album closer, "No Regrets", led many fans to believe that it would be Ace's final album, because of the line "I don't know if it's the end, but yo, it might be". Ace killed the rumors by returning in 2004 with his fifth album A Long Hot Summer, another highly acclaimed effort. The story concept, similar to that on his last release, served as a prelude to the story told on Disposable Arts, chronicling the "Long Hot Summer" that led to his character's incarceration at the beginning of the Disposable Arts album. Rumors once again spread about a retirement, which were again squashed, when Ace announced the formation of his new rap crew named eMC, including himself, Punchline, Wordsworth and his protégé Strick. Ace remarked in a December 2006 interview that he would no longer record as a solo artist, only with eMC.[8] eMC's first group album, The Show, was scheduled for early 2007 but was released in February 2008 digitally and April 2008 physically.

In 2007, Masta Ace had a track included on the Official Joints mixtape, a compilation of previously unreleased tracks by various NYC rappers.

In 2009, Masta Ace joined forces with Boston rapper Ed O.G. to release Arts & Entertainment which was released on November 3, 2009. Arts & Entertainment got shortened to A&E which resulted in the cable TV channel A&E asking Masta and Edo to remove the symbol from their original album artwork. The albums already printed have been sold at live shows following the release of the record.

In 2011 and in 2012 he coaches high school football for the Irvington Blue Knights in NJ.

In 2012, Masta Ace released "MA Doom: Son of Yvonne", produced entirely by MF Doom. He is also set to release a 10th anniversary release of Disposable Arts, featuring new recordings of songs from the album with a live band. The same site interviewed Masta Ace and he explained that Son of Yvonne helps him put across the things he didn't get to say to his mother before she died.

In January 2014, Masta Ace reunited with Stricklin, Wordsworth and Punchline as eMC, signing a record deal with Penalty Entertainment and Sony Red. They're expected to release an EP in April 2014, followed by a sophomore LP due out in early 2015. Punchline left the group in October 2014.

Late 2014, it was announced that Masta Ace signed to M3 Records/Penalty Entertainment for his 6th solo album "The Falling Season" will drop in 2016.

In 2016, Masta Ace was interviewed by Ryan Maxwell for Hip-Hop Kings.The interview spoke in depth about the Disposable Arts re-issue, and the documentary which celebrated 20 years of the album. At the end of the interview, Masta Ace also confirmed he has begun filming another documentary for his critically acclaimed album "A Long Hot Summer".

He and Croatian producer Koolade made a song "Beautiful" that was on his album A Long Hot Summer.

He is featured on a song off of album Protuotrov (antidote) by Bosnian rapper Frenkie, the song is called Živili (live on) featuring Masta Ace & Phat Phillie and is produced by Edo Maajka.

He appeared on Czech hiphop group Prago Union's album "HDP", where he performed on the track "Beat and I a já und ich" along with German rapper Dendemann.

He also appeared on Polish rap group Familia H.P. album "42" on the track "Born In New York".

In 2003 he appeared on the Swedish rapper Chords' track "Get u awn" with Punchline. The track is on the album "The garden around the mansion".

Masta Ace travelled to Australia in 2008 to record for the Funkoars track "This is How" which came off the album The Hangover. The track sampled parts of the Masta Ace's 2004 track "Good Ol' Love". The Funkoars have made several references to Masta Ace in their lyrics as well as using samples in other works.

He is also featured on the track "Sminke" by the critically acclaimed Norwegian Hip Hop band Karpe Diem. The title of the album is Aldri Solgt En Løgn (Never Sold a Lie). In English the word "Sminke" means makeup, and the song is about artists trading their image for what their record companies wants it to be.

In 2007, he appeared on Admit It, a song by Swiss hip hop group Nefew from their album Off the Cuff.

In 2010, he appeared on "Set You Free" along with Wordsworth, a track by UK hip hop DJ/Producer "Skitz" from his album "The Sticksman".

In 2010, he appeared on "You don't know about it" alongside M-Dot, a track by French hip hop DJ/Producer "DJ JEAN MARON" from his album "RUN MPC". It was the lead single of the album and received heavy radio rotations. (released on 12" and CD)

In 2012, he is featured on the track "Progression" by German DJ/Producer DJ Q-fingaz from his album "Qllection".

In 2014, he collaborated with Canberra-based Australian rapper Nix on the single "SHE".

On December 19, 2014, Ace was featured on a track called "My Style" with German Producer The Mighty Moe who also produced for Termanology, Reks and many more.

In 2015, he appeared on "Thinking of You", a song by Swedish hip hop duo "Professor P & DJ Akilles" from their album "All Year, Every Year".

Masta Ace is considered to be a highly skilled and influential MC – music journalist Peter Shapiro describes him as “one of the great pure New York MCs”, and Allmusic describes him as “truly an underappreciated rap veteran and underground luminary”. Commenting on how Masta Ace is sometimes overlooked despite his skill, Rolling Stone says, “even the most avid fan of raw hip-hop lyricism can sometimes neglect to mention Masta Ace alongside hard-bitten champs such as Rakim, KRS-One, Big Daddy Kane, Slick Rick and Kool G Rap”. Eminem mentions Masta Ace as one of his influences in his book ‘The Way I Am’, saying, “Masta Ace had amazing storytelling skills – his thoughts were so vivid”.

Source: Wikipeda

Celebrating the life and career of Christopher Wallace Tags: christopher wallace biggie smalls word life production new quality entertainment feature blog

Born as Christopher Wallace on May 21, 1972, in Brooklyn, New York, Biggie Smalls, also known as Notorious B.I.G., became a drug dealer at a young age. He started experimenting with music as a teenager and, not long after, befriended Sean "Puffy" Combs. His 1994 debut album, Ready to Die, was a smash hit, and his long-running feud with fellow rapper, Tupac Shakur, helped to shape his career. Biggie was killed in Los Angeles on March 9, 1997. 

Early Years

American hip-hop star Biggie Smalls was born as Christopher George Latore Wallace on May 21, 1972 in Brooklyn, New York, in the neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant. Biggie, or "The Notorious B.I.G," as he'd later become known, experienced a rough childhood—at an early age, he was surrounded by drug addicts and dealers. As a result, by his early teens, Biggie had joined the life that was all around him. "Hustlers were my heroes," he once said. "Everything happened on the strip I grew up in. It didn't matter where you went, it was all in your face."

At the age of 17, Biggie was arrested for selling crack, and spent nine months in a North Carolina prison before making bail. As he navigated his young, uncertain life, Biggie started making music. He hooked on with a crew called the "Old Gold Brothers," and began experimenting on his own.

Commercial Success

Around his neighborhood, Biggie Smalls, as he called himself then, began building a reputation as a musician. After a tape of his landed in the hands of Mister Cee, a well-known DJ, Smalls was featured in the hip-hop publication, The Source.

The article was enough to catch the attention of Sean "Puffy" Combs, a young producer at Uptown Entertainment, a New York-based label specializing in hip-hop and rhythm and blues. When Combs split off from Uptown to start his own label, Bad Boy Entertainment, he brought Smalls with him.

Immediately, The Notorious B.I.G., as he now called himself, got to work, appearing on a 1993 remix of Mary J. Blige's single, "Real Love," and followed it up with a second Blige remix, "What's the 411?" His debut as a solo artist came with the single, "Party and Bullpoo," on the soundtrack to the film, Who's the Man? (1993).

In 1994, The Notorious B.I.G. released his debut album, Ready to Die, which told the story of his life, from drug dealer to rapper. Backed with hits like "Juicy" and "Big Poppa," the record went platinum and the young hip-hop artist became a full-fledged star. That same year, The Source named the rapper "Best New Artist," "Best Live Performer" and "Lyricist of the Year."

As his star power increased, Biggie did his best to share his prestige. He backed the work of several rappers that he'd originally performed with while starting out in Brooklyn, and took to the studio in support of other artists on Sean "Puffy" Combs's label. He also teamed up with such stars as Michael Jackson and R. Kelly. By the close of 1995, Biggie was one of music's best-selling and most sought after performers.

Troubled Times

However, success and wealth hardly brought peace to Biggie's life. In the immediate aftermath of Ready to Die's popularity, the rapper found himself in constant fear. In 1994, he told The New York Times that he was disliked for having more money, which came with his fame. The large rapper—at 6 feet and three inches, and tipping the scales at nearly 400 pounds—said that he jumped whenever the door to his apartment building opened, fearing that someone might want to hurt him.

Biggie's fear led to anxiety, which led to spurts of aggression. In May 1995, he allegedly beat up a man after they got into a dispute over a canceled performance. Later, he took a baseball bat to a group of autograph seekers. His most famous battles, however, occurred with others in the hip-hop industry, most notably with Tupac Shakur, Marion "Suge" Knight and Death Row Records. The rivalry turned into an East Coast-West Coast feud (with Combs and Biggie representing the East), and the tension escalated in 1994, when Shakur and a member of the Wu-Tang Clan were shot and robbed. The two men survived and Shakur came out blazing, accusing Biggie and Combs of orchestrating the attack. Both vehemently denied the accusation.

Shakur added fuel to the flames with a pointed slam on the East Coast rap world in the single, "Hit 'Em Up," in which he claimed to have slept with Biggie's wife, Faith Evans. In September 1996, East Coast-West Coast battle heated up even further, when Shakur was murdered in a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas. Rumors of Biggie's involvement immediately began to make the rounds, and when the rapper was one of the few hip-hop artists not to make an appearance at an anti-violence summit that was held in Harlem a few weeks later, the finger-pointing intensified.

Murder and Speculation

Shakur's death amplified Biggie's fears about his own life, and his concern was tragically validated on March 9, 1997. Biggie, who had just come out of the Soul Train Music Awards, was sitting in an SUV when another vehicle pulled up to his car, opened fire and killed him. Biggie was only 24 years old at the time.

For many fans, the murder was viewed as retaliation for Shakur's murder. Biggie's death shook the music world, prompting fears that the hip-hop world might erupt into a full-fledged war, ending numerous other lives. That didn't happen, fortunately, but Biggie's friends, family and fans never received any answers regarding his death. Despite years of speculation regarding the identity of the gunman, Biggie's case was never solved. Biggie's family has been outspoken about its disappointment with the handling of the case, going as far as accusing the Los Angeles Police Department of employing rogue officers who were involved in the murder.

In 2002, filmmaker Nick Broomfield released the documentary Biggie and Tupac, which featured a round of interviews with people associated with both men. More recently, in May 2012, former L.A. police detective Greg Kading, who had worked on Biggie's case, told VH1 that he had incriminating evidence against Wardell "Poochie" Fouse, a gang member belonging to the Mob Piru Bloods.

Kading, who had quit the LAPD after he was pulled from the case, asserts that the murder will never be solved.

Legacy

Biggie's death came just as the rapper was about to put out his second album, Life After Death. In the wake of Biggie's killing, the record was a giant hit, selling nearly 700,000 copies in its first week. Two years later, Born Again, an album of unreleased material from Biggie, was released. A third album of extra material, Duets: The Final Chapter, was released in 2005.

Today, Biggie is still one of the music industry's most admired hip-hop artists. Several musicians have paid tribute to Biggie by mentioning him in their songs, and his musical style has been emulated by countless up-and-coming artists. Undoubtedly, Biggie's talent as a writer and rapper will continue to be acknowledged for decades to come.

© 2014 A+E Networks. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Honoring Hip Hop Legend Masta Ace
Category: Classic Hip Hop
Tags: masta ace hip hop legends word life production online entertainment

Masta Ace has always managed to remain current and totally classic in the exact same breath. I know it sounds impossible, but the truth must be told. As one of the most imaginative, narrative and prolific lyricists ever to emerge from the mean streets of Brooklyn USA, his albums are like mini-movies. As a matter of fact, the man has been born, and re born, and born yet again. In his 1988 lyrical debut, he took a stand along side Big Daddy Kane, Kool G. Rap and Craig G on hip hop's most important posse cut, ‘The Symphony’. His first full length album, the Marley Marl produced Take A Look Around (1990), established the rookie emcee as a sophisticated voice from the ghetto. Slaughtahouse (1993) was an ingenious conversation with hip hop, as Ace and his incorporated crew took on the entire gangsta rap genre. In 1995, his Sittin' On Chrome LP unified American car culture as a celebration of rims and rides and rap music. Then after a 6 year hiatus, Ace caught the world off guard with the epic Disposable Arts (2001). This classic theme album, complete with plot, main characters and score, played like a feature film on wax. A Long Hot Summer, (2004), was the prequel to Disposable Arts. These two “flicks”, were connected, and although Ace was the only actual recurring character, the storylines blended together in a well thought out arrangement. "Coming off of Disposable, I knew I wanted to do another theme album," Ace admits. "I watched ‘Thunderbolt and Lightfoot’ with Clint Eastwood and Jeff Bridges. The whole side-kick movie thing was the original inspiration for that album.” In 2004 he announced that “…Summer” would be his fifth and final solo album. It seems that he was planning a unique and different way to continue making contributions to Hip Hop. Ace has teamed up with Wordsworth, Punchline and Stricklin to form the new group EMC. All three were featured heavily on his last two releases and the chemistry that resulted was undeniable. Ace mentions, “After touring together for the last 6 years, the group album became the natural evolution of our friendship.” The album will be released this summer on M3 Records, an upstart independent label formed by Ace and his partners “Filthy Rich” and “DJ Rob”. "I'm hoping that M3 thing is gonna be the next cool hip hop label," he says. "When you see the logo you're gonna expect quality music. Like back in the days when people saw the Cold Chillin' label they bought the record because they knew it was gonna be something hot. I hope to establish M3 with this new album.”

Score Media -1680 N Vine Street, Ste 316; Hollywood, CA 90028 Phone: 323-466-9500; Fax: 323-466-9501

http://mastaace.com/about/

 

SAMPEACE BROWN IS NOT JUST A REGGAE ARTIST BUT ALSO A HUMANITARIAN Tags: LOVE PEACE HARMONY SORROWS DESPAIR FREEDOM EQUAL RIGHTS AND JUSTICE TO ALL MANKIND IRRESPECTIVE OF RACE CREED RELIGION word life production


Sampeace Brown who was originally born in Nigeria - West Africa with a population of about 150 million people, started his artist career at the age of 14. Sampeace Brown grew up in a big family where singing and listening to pop music and traditional folklore was part of the daily rituals and way of life. This had transpired throughout his early school days leading to the crucial moment after college graduation when it became eminent that the road to exhibit his artistic talent to all mankind was obvious. The year 1978 became the period of revelation on Sampeace Brown as a song writer, composer and singer, even at that early stage, he had already developed the skills of leading a pop group. A boy band- was formed named" T.Bones Family" inspired of his predecessors and legends like: Marvin Gaye, James Brown, Toots & The Metals, Betty Wright, Gladys Night, Curtis Mayfield, Temptations, Stevie Wonder, Candy Staton, Third World, Byron Lee & The Dragoniacs, Jimmy Cliff, Johnny Nash, Manu Dibango, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, Sony Okosun, One World, The Wailers, Rex Lawson, Osadebe, etc,etc.

 

Sampeace Brown became the architect, leader, the group's song writer and lead vocalist. Their first demo delivery to a local reputable record label, quickly fetched the group record contract and all their studio undertakings same year at some of Nigerias most populous and well equipped studios: Phonodisc and EMI studios Lagos precipitated their debut album "MUSIC CROSSROADS" which quickly created a sensational hit all over the geographical territories of the states of Nigeria, where pop music was consumed in mass. The group’s smash hit also extended to other parts of West African territories too. The group had 3 subsequent releases with major tours when the members had decided to take a break and Sampeace Brown had already moved to Europe. They later decided to make a re-union in Lagos-Nigeria in 1986 when the group’s last album "Eat the Apple" was hatched, recorded at Recordisc ltd, Shanolu studios, EMI studios Lagos and released in same year, which marked the end of the period for the group. Sampeace who has already been residing in Scandinavia (Norway) since the early 80's had then decided to poseur his solo career in 1986.

 

1989 finally became a breaking point for Sampeace Brown's solo career into the Norwegian main stream music scene. Having grown up in a cosmopolitan type of society, he technically analyzed the core of his musical ambition and concept as symbiosis of Reggae, Soul, R&B, Funk, Afro-pop and West African hilfe music, derived from all species, hard core of the Pan African, American, Caribbean and European musical heritage represented in all corners of the globe. Sampeace Brown has within more than two decades of his artist career in Scandinavia managed to acquaint himself with the Norwegian music industry and worked with various musicians, producers, record labels, both at home and abroad. In his relentless efforts to get his recorded works exposed into the pan Scandinavian/European market in 1987, the indie label T-Kay Music was used as a platform to enhance securing record deals with both Majors, Semi-Majors and Indie Record labels in Scandinavia, Caribbean’s, Africa, and North America where some of Sampeace Brown's recorded works were released and have since the beginning of his artist career sold a good number of records, mostly in Africa.

 

Sampeace Brown’s music and lyrical expressions principally reflects on our day to day life, in terms of LOVE, SEX, PEACE, HARMONY, SORROWS, DESPAIR, FREEDOM, EQUAL RIGHTS AND JUSTICE TO ALL MANKIND IRRESPECTIVE OF RACE, CREED, RELIGION, GENDER, ETHNICITY, NATIONALITY OR POLITICAL LEANING.

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