Tagged with "and"
Evander Holyfield - One of the greatest boxers of all time! Tags: evander holyfield greatest boxer all time word life production new quality sports entertainment

Evander Holyfield was born in 1962 in the small town of Atmore, Alabama. He was the youngest of nine children and raised by Annie Laura, a single mother who worked for hours cooking meals at a local restaurant. At the age of 12, Holyfield and his family relocated to Atlanta, Georgia, where he grew up.

Holyfield’s Amateur Career

In the early 1980s, Holyfield participated in the Golden Gloves competitions as an amateur and won. After winning the competition, he qualified to compete in the Junior Olympics in Los Angeles. During the match, Holyfield experienced a huge setback in the ring. The match officials disqualified him during a semi-final match against his opponent – New Zealand-born Kevin Barry – for hitting him after the break. Despite this disappointment, he managed to take home a bronze medal.

Boxing as a Professional

Soon after the 1984 Junior Olympics, Evander Holyfield became a professional boxer. He made his first appearance as a professional fighter when he fought against Lionel Byram in the televised match in November of 1984. From 1986, he went on to beat big names in boxing such as Jessy Shelby, Chisanda Mutti, Mike Brothers, Terry Mims to name a few.

He won the world champion title from the WBA Cruiserweight Champion Dwight Muhammad Qawi. In 1988, Holyfield expressed his desire to compete at the heavyweight level so as to take the title from legendary boxer Mike Tyson. He trained hard to become strong enough to compete as a heavyweight boxer.

Fighting as a Heavyweight

As a heavyweight fighter, he fought against and defeated boxing champions like Michael Dokes, James Tillis, Adilson Rodrigues, Alex Stewart and Pinklon Thomas. Ultimately, Holyfield successfully won the heavyweight title, but not from Tyson.

Mike Tyson lost the title to James Douglas in Tokyo, leaving Holyfield with no choice but to fight against Douglas, whom he beat after seven minutes. Prior to the defeat, James Douglas was the WBA, IBF, and WBC champion. During Holyfield’s attempt to defend the crown, he faced legends such as Bert Cooper, Foreman George, Riddick Bowe and Larry Holmes.

Rivalries

Holyfield began a rivalry with Riddick Bowe that started in the early 1990s. He was defeated by Riddick Bowe in 1992, which resulted in Holyfield losing his title. It was his very first loss in 29 fights. In 1993, he was back in action and ready to reclaim his championship title. Holyfield did exactly that when he got his rematch with Riddick Bowe, winning the match by decision.

However, he did not hold on to the title for long. In 1994, he was defeated by challenger Michael Moorer. After going to the hospital following the match to have his shoulder examined, it was discovered that he had a heart condition that required him to retire from boxing.

Making a Comeback

HolyfieldAt first, Holyfield planned to hang up his gloves and retire, but televangelist Benny Hinn convinced him otherwise. After passing a health test, Holyfield was back in action. His first match was against Olympic gold medalist Ray Mercer, whom Holyfield knocked out. In 1996, Holyfield ultimately got the chance to face a legendary and controversial fighter – Mike Tyson – and their first encounter ended in favor of Evander Holyfield.

Holyfield granted Tyson a rematch and the second bout became the most talked about boxing match in history. Tyson was disqualified after biting off a chunk of Evander Holyfield’s ear. It was an image which was seen across the world and it essentially ruined Tyson’s reputation. The incident led to a public outcry around the world.

Holyfield’s Greatest Achievement

Evander Holyfield is renowned for his heavyweight fights. Despite the challenges in his career, he has been able to solidify himself as one of the world’s best boxers of the last three decades. Holyfield’s record stands at 38 wins, including 25 knockouts, eight losses, and two draws.

Personal life

Away from the boxing world, Evander Holyfield is a pastor whose heroes are Martin Luther King, Jr. and South Africa’s Nelson Mandela. Aside from contributing financially to evangelical causes, he began a college fund for students who come from poor families. In 1996, he published his autobiography entitled Holyfield: The Humble Warrior. In 2003, he married for the third time.

Source: Totally History

A native of Maryland inspired by God - Kenny Sway Tags: kenny sway native maryland god future entertainment word life production new quality entertainment

The singers that inspired me was from the Temptations; Eddie Kendrick's was a great inspiration because of his high pitch tenor, David Ruffin, who had that old soul of a raspy voice, Paul Williams, who wasn't afraid to take big risks, Otis Williams who knew how to come in with the harmony and Melvin because of his great bass drive.

I have no set sound; I love and enjoy every bit of music. I want to go above and beyond the peek of music. I want my audience to experience a life changing move of music. I believe

life is music and music is life. I want my audience to say to themself "Kenny Sway music inspired them to move on and hold back nothing from life". I want my audience to know, that my gift is from God, and when I sing; I want the audience to experience the love and heart of Jesus Christ in any song that I sing and know that we as one can make the world a better place for all man kind; living in peace and harmony.

My first song after elementary school, was a song called (Relax). I grew and matured in my music, performing in Washington, DC whenever and where ever I could perform with my band the Unknown; most of the time we perform on the streets of Washington, DC. My music has touched everyone and moved them in one way or another. I want to thank everyone that has supported me and those who continue to support me and continue to believe in me, thank you. Remember, your dreams are already your reality; for God I live and for God I'll die. Hear me, see me on Youtube-Kenny Sway, Instagram- kenny_Sway, Viemo-Kenny Sway and SoundCloud-Kenny Sway.

 

Arn Anderson - One of the greatest wrestlers of all time Tags: arn anderson greatest wrestling all time word life production featured blog

Martin Anthony Lunde (born September 20, 1958) better known by his ring name Arn Anderson, is a former American professional wrestler and author. His career has been highlighted by his alliances with Ric Flair and various members of the wrestling stable, The Four Horsemen, in the NWA/WCW. He currently serves as the senior producer for WWE's Raw brand. On March 31, 2012, Anderson was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame as a member of the Four Horsemen.

Lunde began his career in early 1982,trained by Ted Lipscomb(Allen) spending much of the year wrestling in various independent wrestling companies across the United States.[2] By the middle of 1983, he made his way to Southeastern Championship Wrestling, an NWA affiliated promotion operating out of Tennessee and Alabama. Taking the name of "Super Olympia", Lunde soon became a member of Ron Fuller's Stud Stable before the year was out. Lunde saw success in the tag team ranks by winning the NWA Southeastern Tag Team Championship three times with Mr. Olympia and once with Pat Rose throughout 1984. It was also here in this promotion that Lunde met and began what would become a lifelong friendship with Flair. By the end of the year, however, Lunde left the company and joined Mid South Wrestling based out of Shreveport. Lunde's time in Mid South was coming to an end and during a TV taping the Junk Yard Dog mentioned to Bill Watts, the owner of Mid South Wrestling, that Lunde looked like an Anderson. Watts called Jim Crockett and convinced him to book Lunde.

Lunde made his way to Jim Crockett, Jr.'s Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling based in the Virginias and the Carolinas. By this time, the company extended its range into Georgia after rival promoter Vince McMahon purchased Georgia Championship Wrestling. There was a strong physical resemblance between Lunde and Ole Anderson, who had achieved legendary status in the Georgia and Mid-Atlantic territories as a tag team wrestler. Ole noticed that Lunde's style was a no nonsense approach in the ring and specialized in working over a part of an opponent's body throughout the match, much like Ole himself. Anderson agreed to work with Lunde, helping to hone his capabilities, and re-formed the Minnesota Wrecking Crew with Lunde replacing Gene Anderson and taking on the name of Arn Anderson, Ole's kayfabe nephew. The team quickly became a force in the territory by capturing the NWA National Tag Team Championship in March 1985.[2] Arn and Ole defended the titles throughout the year, with their highest profile match being part of the card for Starrcade '85 on Thanksgiving night. The Crew successfully defended the titles against Wahoo McDaniel and Billy Jack Haynes.

In the latter half of 1985, the Andersons formed a loose knit alliance with fellow heels Tully Blanchard and Ric Flair, as they began to have common enemies. The foursome frequently teamed together in six and, sometimes, eight-man tag matches or interfered in each other's matches to help score a victory or, at least, to prevent each other from losing their titles. The alliance quickly became a force within the territory, working in feuds against some of the biggest stars in the company like Dusty Rhodes, Magnum T.A., the Road Warriors and the Rock 'n' Roll Express. Anderson also saw success as a singles wrestler on January 4, 1986 by winning the vacant NWA Television Championship.[2] Simultaneously, Anderson was still one half of the NWA National Tag Team Champions and, even though Crockett promotions abandoned the National Tag titles in March, Anderson's success as a duo champion elevated his status within the territory. It was also during this time (in 1986) that the Andersons, Blanchard, and Flair began calling themselves Four Horsemen with James J. Dillon serving as the group's manager.[2] Anderson also had a tremendous ability to do interviews to further the storylines he participated in. His ability to improvise in interviews allowed him to coin the "Four Horsemen" moniker for the stable, as he likened their coming to wrestle at an event and the aftermath of their wrath as being akin to the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, and the name stuck. Anderson continued his reign as NWA Television Champion for most of the year, holding the championship for just over 9 months before losing it to Dusty Rhodes on September 9, 1986.

The first real setback with the Horsemen occurred at Starrcade '86 after Anderson and Ole lost a Steel Cage match to The Rock 'n' Roll Express, with Ole getting pinned. The subsequent storyline positioned Ole as the weak link within the team, possibly attributed to his age. Ole's position with the group was only further weakened after he decided to take two months off after Starrcade. After Ole's return in February 1987, the other Horsemen turned on him and threw him out of the group, resulting in Ole incurring numerous attacks over the next several months. Afterwards, Ole was replaced with Lex Luger and the Horsemen resumed their dominance of the company.

As a member of the Horsemen, Anderson continued to be involved in high profile angles within the company. By mid-1987, Anderson and fellow Horsemen Tully Blanchard began regularly competing as a tag team and rose quickly through the tag team ranks.[2] The duo faced the Rock 'n' Roll Express for the NWA World Tag Team Championship on September 29, 1987 and were victorious.[2] This win further solidified the group's dominance in the company as Lex Luger was the reigning NWA United States Heavyweight Champion and Ric Flair spent most of 1987 as the NWA World Heavyweight Champion, losing it to Ron Garvin in September, only to regain it at Starrcade '87 on Thanksgiving night. Anderson and Tully continued to feud throughout the rest of the year and first few months of 1988 with the Road Warriors, the Rock 'n' Roll Express and the Midnight Express being their most frequent rivals.

By December 1987, Luger had defected from the Horsemen and began a heated feud with the group, with Ric Flair especially. In early 1988, Luger formed a tag team with Barry Windham and began challenging Anderson and Blanchard for the NWA World Tag Team Championship. The bigger, stronger team of Windham and Luger were eventually successful, winning the titles on March 27, 1988. The reign would be short lived, however, as Anderson and Blanchard regained the titles less than a month later after Barry Windham turned on Luger during their match and joined the Horsemen. Though Anderson and Blanchard were two of the biggest stars in Crockett's company, they were frequently in dispute with Crockett over their pay. Despite the fact that the two, along with the Horsemen, were helping to generate millions of dollars in revenue for the company, they considered themselves to be underpaid. Their last contracted match with the company took place on September 10, 1988 when they dropped the NWA World Tag Team Championship to the Midnight Express before leaving for the WWF.

Arn Anderson once described his style and that of Blanchard's on national TV: 'I'm his strength, and he's my speed.'

Anderson and Blanchard left Crockett's company to join Vince McMahon's World Wrestling Federation. Upon being named the Brain Busters, the team took Bobby "The Brain" Heenan as their manager and quickly began rising through the tag team ranks, eventually coming to challenge Demolition for the WWF Tag Team Championship. On July 18, 1989, the Brain Busters won the titles, ending Demolition's historic reign of 478 days; the match would air on the July 29 edition of Saturday Night's Main Event. Although they would lose the titles back to Demolition just over three months later, the Brain Busters continued to be a force in the WWF's tag team division.

In December 1989, Anderson left the WWF and went back to his old stomping grounds.[2] Blanchard was slated to return as well but WWF accused him of testing positive for cocaine. Crockett's company was now called World Championship Wrestling and was under the ownership of billionaire mogul Ted Turner. Anderson helped to reform the Horsemen and he quickly found success in the company, winning the NWA World Television Championship an January 2, 1990.[2] Anderson remained the champion almost the entire year before dropping it to Tom Zenk. Zenk's reign would be short lived, however, as Anderson regained the title, having been renamed the WCW World Television Championship on January 14, 1991.[2] His third reign with the title was also considered successful as he held the title a little more than five months before dropping it to "Beautiful" Bobby Eaton on May 19, 1991. Afterwards, Anderson entered the tag team ranks of WCW.

In the summer of 1991, Anderson formed a tag team with Larry Zbyszko and they called themselves The Enforcers. After competing for several months and moving up in the tag team ranks, they successfully captured the WCW World Tag Team Championship on September 2, 1991. The reign would be short lived, however, as they lost the titles roughly two and a half months later to Ricky Steamboat and Dustin Rhodes. Anderson and Zbyszko went their separate ways shortly afterward. Anderson quickly rebounded from his split with Zbyszko and formed a tag team with Beautiful Bobby Eaton, a long-time friend and best known for his time as one half of the Midnight Express. At this point, they were members of Paul E. Dangerously's Dangerous Alliance. They quickly moved up the tag team division and were soon a threat to Steamboat and Rhodes. Anderson and Eaton quickly won the titles on January 16, 1992 and defended the titles against all comers for the next four and a half months before losing the titles to The Steiner Brothers in May.

In May 1993, Anderson joined Ole Anderson and Ric Flair to re-form the Four Horsemen. The Horsemen introduced Paul Roma as their newest member. Although athletic and a skilled in-ring competitor, Roma had spent much of his career as a jobber in the WWF. As part of an interview segment for the Ric Flair and the Four Horsemen DVD, Triple H stated that he thought the addition of Roma made the membership the weakest in the history of the group, and Arn himself referred to Roma as "a glorified gym rat". Although Anderson and Roma won the WCW World Tag Team Championship in August, the group quickly split and was seen as a dismal failure by WCW.

Anderson remained a regular, on-screen performer in WCW over the next few years. He rejoined Col. Rob Parker's Stud Stable in 1994 with Terry Funk, Bunkhouse Buck, "Stunning" Steve Austin and Meng.[3] The Stud Stable feuded heavily with Dusty and Dustin Rhodes until late 1994 when Funk left. In early 1995, Meng left (eventually to join the Dungeon of Doom).

Anderson went to rejoin Ric Flair. Anderson's last championship run began on January 8, 1995 after winning the WCW World Television Championship. Anderson helped restore the prestige of the title, which he held for just over six months before dropping it to The Renegade. He briefly feuded with long-time friend Flair, and was assisted by Brian Pillman in his efforts. However, it was a swerve to reunify the Horsemen with Flair, Anderson, Pillman, and a partner to be named later (who ended up being Chris Benoit).

By the end of 1996, Anderson rarely competed in the ring as years of wear and tear on his body finally started to catch up with him. On the August 25, 1997 episode of WCW Monday Nitro, Anderson formally announced his retirement from the ring.[2] While standing in the ring, surrounded by Ric Flair and newest Horsemen members Steve McMichael and Benoit, Anderson declared that his last official act as the "Enforcer" for the Four Horsemen was to offer his "spot" in the group to Curt Hennig, as he was forced to retire due to extensive neck and upper back injuries. He would work one or two tag matches officially since then, including teaming with David Flair on an episode of WCW Thunder, but his physical involvement was extremely limited in those bouts.

On the September 14, 1998 edition of Nitro, alongside Steve McMichael, Dean Malenko, and Chris Benoit, Anderson ceremoniously reintroduced Ric Flair to WCW after his 12-month hiatus. In doing so, they reformed the Horsemen who then feuded with WCW President Eric Bischoff. Flair would win the presidency of WCW from Bischoff on the December 28, 1998 episode of WCW Monday Nitro followed by winning the WCW World Heavyweight Championship at Uncensored '99 and turn heel in the process. Anderson remained Flair's right-hand man during this time as he attempted to keep Flair's delusional hunger for power at bay.

In 2000, Anderson was a member of the short-lived Old Age Outlaws. Led by Terry Funk, the group of veteran wrestlers battled the revived New World Order. WCW would be purchased by the World Wrestling Federation in 2001, ending Anderson's tenure there.

Not long after the closing of WCW, Anderson became a road agent for WWF, renamed World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) in May 2002.[2] He occasionally appears on WWE television trying to, with the help of other WWE management, pull apart backstage brawls. Soon after the WCW/ECW Invasion storyline, Anderson took up color commentary for a WCW World Heavyweight Championship match between Booker T and Buff Bagwell, WCW Cruiserweight Championship match with Billy Kidman and Gregory Helms as well as another WCW Championship match between Diamond Dallas Page and Booker T, which would be his only appearances as a commentator in WWE. He made an appearance on Raw in 2002 delivering a video to Triple H before he was supposed to renew his wedding vows to then-heel, Stephanie McMahon. Anderson was also assaulted on Raw by the heel gimmick of The Undertaker leading up the Undertaker vs. then-babyface, Ric Flair match at WrestleMania X8. During that bout, Anderson made a brief in-ring appearance, delivering his signature spinebuster to The Undertaker. He would later turn heel once again by helping the heel gimmick of Ric Flair in his feud with Stone Cold Steve Austin, leading to Austin literally urinating on him. Several months later he became a face once again and attempted to help a then-babyface Flair gain (kayfabe) sole ownership of WWE during a match with the heel gimmick of Vince McMahon, but backed down from a confrontation with Brock Lesnar, who entered the ring to assist McMahon.

Anderson made a special appearance at the October 2006 Raw Family Reunion special, in which he was in Ric Flair's corner for his match against Mitch of the Spirit Squad. Anderson was in the corner of Flair, Sgt. Slaughter, Dusty Rhodes, and Ron Simmons at Survivor Series 2006, where the four faced the Spirit Squad, but was ejected from the arena during the match.

On the March 31, 2008 Raw, Anderson came out to say his final goodbye to Ric Flair and thank him for his career. In October of that year, at the No Mercy event, he was backstage congratulating Triple H for retaining the WWE Championship in a match with Jeff Hardy.

Anderson and his wife Erin have two sons, Barrett Anthony (born 1985) and Brock (born 1997).

Although he was billed as such at various times, Arn is not related to Gene Anderson, Lars Anderson, Ole Anderson, C.W. Anderson or Ric Flair. He was given the Anderson name and was originally billed as Ole's brother, and then later billed as Ole's nephew, because of his resemblance to Ole in appearance and wrestling style and billed as Ric Flair's cousin. Flair is not related to any of the Andersons, but he is a longtime friend of Arn.

In 1993, Anderson was involved in a brutal stabbing incident during a WCW tour of Europe. On October 27, 1993, in Blackburn, Lancashire, Anderson and Sid Eudy were involved in an argument at a hotel bar. After being sent to their rooms by security chief Doug Dillinger, Eudy later attacked Anderson with a chair leg. A pair of safety scissors was introduced into the brawl by one of the participants, with Eudy receiving four stab wounds and Anderson receiving twenty, losing a pint and a half of blood. The fight was broken up by WCW wrestler Too Cold Scorpio, who was credited with saving Anderson's life. Neither man pressed charges against the other, and British police declined to do so since both men were leaving the country. Eudy was later fired over the incident.[4]

As stated in his biography, in a match in 1994, Arn was thrown into the ring ropes. The top rope broke from the turnbuckle, but he was able to land on his feet. Six months later, the same event happened again, but this time he landed full-force on to the concrete and hit his head, neck, and upper back. He never took time off to heal. As time passed, with no down time, the injuries worsened. In his biography, Anderson states that the first sign of problems was, during a match, his left arm suddenly went numb and unresponsive. Later on, they found a rib, possibly torn away from the spine during the accident, was popping in and out of joint, causing shoulder discomfort and weakness.

Upon seeing his chiropractor in Charlotte, North Carolina, and consulting medical experts in Atlanta, Georgia, the damage was found to be much more severe and surgery was deemed the only option to keep his left arm functioning at all. Surgery occurred in Atlanta in late 1996 (resulting in a left posterior laminectomy of the 3rd, 4th, and 5th cervical bones and a fusion of the 7th cervical and 1st thoracic bones) and was successful in repairing most of the damage, but there does remain some muscle weakness, loss of fine motor control, and loss of muscle mass in his left arm. He spent many weeks in the hospital during that time, crediting his recovery to his wife, his physical therapist, and the fact he did not want his children to be fatherless. However, he would be readmitted in March 1997 with symptoms akin to cardiac arrest and pulmonary failure, but was released soon afterwards.

In July 1997, while working out, a friend saw him at a gym and gave him a hearty slap on the back (he recounts this in his retirement speech). He dropped the water bottle he was carrying and could not regain use of his left arm for several hours. He realized that to step back in the ring and take another injury to the neck could leave him paralyzed or worse. Hence, his retirement and subsequent speech on WCW  programming.

The Comedy Central series Tosh.0 has referred to Anderson on a regular basis beginning with its October 15th, 2009 episode featuring a backyard wrestler redemption. Host Daniel Tosh stated that real wrestling is all about "showmanship and tights", and that if "being a great technician were all it took, then Arn Anderson would be the most famous wrestler in the world". Tosh has continued to "call out" Anderson, even referring to a gap between mentions as "(going) easy on you". Tosh's March 6, 2012 memorabilia dump included a signed Arn Anderson action figure.

Source: Wikipedia

Andrea the Giant - One of the greatest wrestlers of all time Tags: andrea giant greatest wrestler all time word life production new quality entertainment feature blog

At 7'4" and 500 pounds, Andre the Giant could have been famous for his size alone. His drive, talent and ambition, however, proved to be as big as Andre himself, and the wrestler became legendary for his achievements in and out of the ring.

Andre was born Andre Rene Roussimoff in Grenoble, France on May 19, 1946. His parents, Boris and Marian Roussimoff, and four siblings were of average size. Andre, however, suffered from acromegaly, a disease that results in an over abundance of growth hormones. Also known as Giantism, this disease caused Andre's body to continue growing his whole life, and by the time he was 17 he stood 6'7".

Due to his immense stature it seemed inevitable that Andre would excel in the wrestling world. He had just started to make a name for himself in the ring as "Monster Eiffel Tower" or "Monster Roussimoff" when French-Canadian wrestler Edouard Carpentier first laid eyes on him. Carpentier was impressed with Andre's raw talent and decided to bring him to North America. Andre began wrestling under the name Jean Ferre in Canada for Grand Prix Promotions. In a short time Andre went from the undercard to being a headlining name. Inspired by the movie King Kong he acquired the nickname, "The 8th Wonder of the World," which stayed with him for the rest of his career.

By the time Andre had performed in front of 20,000 wrestling fans in Montreal, his legend had reached Vince McMahon, Sr. at the World Wide Wrestling Federation's (WWWF) headquarters. McMahon would forever alter Andre's life. In 1972, McMahon signed Andre to wrestle for the WWWF and changed his name to capitalize on his colossal size. "Andre the Giant" became one of the most recognizable names in wrestling. Andre performed under his new name at Madison Square Garden, where he easily defeated his opponent Buddy Wolfe without breaking a sweat. Before long, Andre's venues were sold out and wrestlers lined up to perform in his shadow. As Andre's fame grew to stardom, he was featured in Sports Illustrated in the largest feature they had ever published.

In 1987 Andre drew the biggest crowd in WWF (formerly WWWF) history thus far. A record 90,000 fans packed the Pontiac Silver Dome in Detroit, Michigan to watch Andre wrestle fellow legend Hulk Hogan in the main event of WrestleMania III. In all, Andre participated at six WrestleManias and faced some of the toughest opponents in the business, including Big John Studd and Jake "The Snake" Roberts. For many years he was known as the "Uncrowned Champion," until he found his place in infamy and held the WWF title for the shortest reign in history. This wasn't the only championship Andre captured - he also won titles in the (NWA), (IWA) and the WWF Tag Team Championship.

Andre's fame also opened the door to Hollywood. He made his acting debut in 1975 as "Big Foot" in The Six Million Dollar Man. Andre enjoyed the experience and went on to appear in television shows including B.J. and the Bear, The Fall Guy and The Greatest American Hero, and movies such as Conan the Destroyer, Micki and Maude, and Trading Mom. His favorite role, and the one for which he is best remembered, was the lovable giant "Fezzik" in Rob Reiner's classic The Princess Bride.

Andre's last television appearance was on a celebration of 20 years of NWA/WCW wrestling on TBS. Sadly, over the years the effects of acromegaly had continued to wear down his body. Eventually his immense size was just too much for his heart, and Andre the Giant died in Paris, France in his hotel room on January 27, 1993. His ashes were later taken home and spread over his North Carolina ranch.

Though professionally Andre will always be remembered as The 8th Wonder of the World, he is known and loved by fans across the globe as The Gentle Giant.

 

Source: Official Website

England's three time Footballer of the Year-Thierry Henry Tags: football soccer three time player year england paris france thierry henry word life production

Henry is one of the most outrageously talented players of the past decade. From the callow youth who top-scored during France's triumph at the 1998 World Cup to his country's captain and all-time record goalscorer, surpassing the great Michel Platini, Henry is a French icon.

Having emerged from the Monaco youth ranks under the guidance of a certain Arsene Wenger, Henry's abortive move to Juventus followed, where he was largely used as a winger under Carlo Ancelotti, before Wenger parted with £10.5 million to link up once again with the man he would transform into Europe's most feared forward.

Victory at Euro 2000 saw his star rise and Henry was converted from a winger to a dazzling striker, winning the Double with Arsenal before going on to dominate the league in the years to follow. His club record tally of 228 goals in 377 games included all manner of spectacular strikes and unforgettable matches, and he signed off in Highbury's final game, typically, with a hat-trick.

But a move to Emirates Stadium in 2006 signalled the beginning of the end for Henry. In that summer he lost in both the final of the Champions League and the World Cup, and while he signed a new contract with Arsenal despite strong interest from Barcelona, he suffered from fitness problems and eventually moved to Catalunya in the summer of 2007, bringing to an end a golden period in England during which he won two titles, two FA Cups and five player of the year awards.

In Barcelona, Henry would finally capture the Champions League trophy that had eluded him when playing a prominent role in Barca's remarkable Treble-winning campaign of 2008-09, but the following year saw him left out of the side and he embarked on a new challenge in the MLS a few weeks after France's dismal World Cup campaign.

His efforts with the New York Red Bulls saw him land the Major League Soccer Eastern Conference in 2010 but, in January 2011, he was given another chance at the Gunners as Arsenal took him back for a two-month loan period. His return to the club came just weeks after his statue was erected outside the Emirates stadium and his goal against Leeds United in the FA Cup was a moment to remember for all.

His legacy at Arsenal will live on forever, but his hunger for glory continued as he picked up the MLS Eastern Conference again in 2013, along with the MLS Supporters' Shield.

Strengths: One of the most complete forwards of recent times, Henry boasts electric pace, superb control, intricate technique and unrivalled composure in front of goal. His creative streak is put to good use when unselfishly teeing up team-mates with finesse and he has a strong character and a winner's mentality. Also a threat from set-pieces.

Weaknesses: Finding fault in Henry is a difficult enterprise, but a headed goal is a rarity from the Frenchman and fitness problems have afflicted him somewhat in recent seasons. His suitability for a captaincy role has also been questioned.

Career high: Henry was at his peak when Arsenal went the entire Premier League season unbeaten in 2003-04, scoring a highly impressive 30 goals in 37 league appearances and being named both PFA Players' Player of the Year and Footballer of the Year.

Career low: Becoming a target for venomous criticism and a national hate figure in Ireland when he committed a blatant handball before squaring for William Gallas to score the goal that took France to the World Cup finals.

Style: Flamboyant, prolific, complete, a once-in-a-generation striker.

Quotes: "When I first put him at centre forward, he said, 'Look I cannot score goals' [but] for someone who cannot score goals he has done quite well! He is a legend at the club, and if you ask every Arsenal fan 'who is the [key] player of Arsenal?' they will say Thierry Henry." Arsene Wenger, July 2014

Trivia: Henry is the only player to have been named England's Footballer of the Year on three separate occasions , although individual accolades on an international level have always eluded him.

Source: ESPNFC

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