Tagged with "boy"
The Beastie Boys’ unconventional methodology represented a unique hybrid of rock and hip-hop
Category: Classic Hip Hop
Tags: Beastie boys classic hip hop word life production new quality entertainment

Adam Yauch aka MCA (vocals, bass; August 5, 1964 – May 4, 2012), Michael Diamond aka Mike D (vocals, drums; born November 20, 1966), Adam Horowitz aka ADROCK (vocals, guitar; born October 31, 1966)

The Beastie Boys combined hardcore and hip-hop in a fresh-sounding musical mashup that was danceable, infectious and wickedly funny. By attracting a sizable following of white fans – hardcore-loving teens and party-minded frat kids – with their bratty wit and cunning collages of beats and samples, they broadened the audience for hip-hop, bringing it into the mainstream. Like their fellow New York rappers Run-D.M.C., they ignored the color line dividing rock and rap in the Eighties.

Due to their brash humor and punkish sensibility, the Beastie Boys have been called “the bastard brat offspring of Sesame Street and the Sex Pistols,” “AC/DC meets Run-D.M.C. with a teenage wit” and “the Marx Brothers of rap.” Over time, the Beastie Boys would also embrace a degree of maturity, exploring their creativity with ever-more adventurous mixtures of samples and live playing, and delving into jazzy funk-soul grooves on intermittent instrumental projects. 

The Beastie Boys are inextricably associated with the street-smart attitude and urban swagger of New York City, where they were raised. The roots of the Beastie Boys date back to 1981. Formed as a hardcore quartet, the original lineup comprised Mike D (real name: Michael Diamond), drummer Kate Schellenbach and guitarist John Berry – who’d all belonged to an earlier group called the Young Aborigines – and MCA (Adam Yauch). Their first performance was at Yauch’s 17th birthday party. This lineup recorded an eight-song debut EP, Polly Wog Stew, released in 1982 on the Rat Cage label. It contained their hardcore manifesto “Beastie Boys.” Mike D later revealed that “Beastie” stood for “Boys Entering Anarchistic States Towards Internal Excellence.”

They invited their friend ADROCK (Adam Horowitz), who was in a band called the Young and the Useless, to join when Berry left. The slightly revised foursome cut a 12-inch single, “Cooky Puss”/”Beastie Revolution.” Released in 1983, these comical rants attracted attention and got them gigs. Over the next year, the Beastie Boys evolved from an instrument-thrashing hardcore group to a full-on rap act. Schellenbach moved on to the group Luscious Jackson, and the surviving Beasties – Mike D, MCA and King Ad-Rock (later shortened to ADROCK) – became a three-man posse of MCs with deejayed accompaniment. A friend of theirs, New York University student Rick Rubin (aka “DJ Double R”) was an early turntablist for the Beastie Boys before becoming a world-renowned record producer and label mogul.

In 1984, Rubin and Russell Simmons launched the Def Jam label, and the Beastie Boys’ next 12-inch single, “Rock Hard,” was among its initial releases. Based on their growing buzz, Madonna tapped the Beastie Boys as the opening act on her spring 1985 Virgin Tour. The group’s third 12-inch single, “She’s On It,” was featured in the hip-hop film Krush Groove (1985). The flip side, “Slow and Low,” was given to them by Run-D.M.C., who also tapped the Beastie Boys as a support act (along with LL Cool J and Whodini) on their 1986 Raising Hell Tour. It was rap’s first big-budget tour.

The Beastie Boys brashly announced themselves to the world with the full-length Licensed to Ill (1986). A milestone rap-rock release, it contained a feisty statement of purpose (“The New Style”) and the boisterous Gen X anthem “(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (to Party!),” a Top 10 hit. Later described by MCA as “a joke that went too far,” it turned into the party-rock anthem of the Eighties. The raucous video they made for the song – intended as nothing more than “a goof,” in MCA’s words - became a staple of MTV, establishing the Beastie Boys as poster boys for rude, obnoxious fun. Other songs on the album – including ”She’s Crafty,” “Paul Revere,” “Girls,” “No Sleep Till Brooklyn” and “Brass Monkey” – reinforced the notion of the Beastie Boys as a threesome obsessed with girls, rhymes and good times. Rubin’s hook-minded production, and galvanizing bursts of guitars and drums gave the album a forceful sound. It was a rap album that rock fans could get into. On tour, the Beastie Boys reveled in bacchanalian excess; their stage props included a dancing cage and a 20-foot hydraulic penis.

Licensed to Ill was a pop-culture phenomenon, becoming the first rap album to reach Number One. It topped Billboard’s album chart for seven weeks and has sold more than 9 million copies in the U.S. alone, making it among the best-selling rap albums ever. While it typecast the Beastie Boys as party animals, the group exploded any notions of one-dimensionality with its ambitious followup, Paul’s Boutique (1989). Having fallen out with Rubin and Def Jam in the wake of Licensed to Ill’s stratospheric success, the Beastie Boys now found themselves on a new label (Capitol) with a different set of producer/collaborators (the Dust Brothers). Although it didn’t sell as well as its predecessor, Paul’s Boutique was a dizzyingly brilliant, sample-heavy collage that has been called “the Pet Sounds and Dark Side of the Moon of hip-hop." 

A kaleidoscopic montage of quick-cut samples and smart-mouthed spiel drawn from seemingly every corner of the pop-culture spectrum, from Johnny Cash to the glam-rock group Sweet, Paul’s Boutique attained the status of a critically revered masterpiece. “It’s safe to say that nobody has ever made a more unexpectedly brilliant sophomore blast than the Beastie Boys,” wrote Rolling Stone’s Rob Sheffield in a retrospective re-review. “[It’s] a celebration of American junk culture that is still blowing minds today.”

The Beastie Boys released three albums in the Nineties – Check Your Head (1992), Ill Communication (1994), and Hello Nasty (1998) – along with a smattering of EPs. With these releases, the Beastie Boys – who are competent instrumentalists - developed a self-contained style of writing and recording that involved collective jamming, individual composing, sampling, revising and assembling. The Beastie Boys –assisted by keyboardist Money Mark (real name: Mark Nipooa), studio hand Mario Caldato, Jr. and turntablists DJ Hurricane (real name: Wendell Fite) and Mix Master Mike (real name: Michael Schwartz) – performed most of the music while integrating an array of samples, beats and witty wordplay into an ever-intriguing sonic smorgasbord.

The Beastie Boys’ unconventional methodology represented a unique hybrid of rock and hip-hop approaches, and the painstaking process involved meant that years passed between releases. In fact, the Beastie Boys released only one vocal album, To the 5 Boroughs (2004), in the first decade of the 21st century. However, the Beastie Boys released a few all-instrumental projects along the way, including 2007’s The Mix-Up, which won a Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Album. 

Although they came intermittently, the Beastie Boys’ albums were packed with music. Check Your Head, Ill Communication and Hello Nasty each contain 20 or more tracks. Beginning with Check Your Head, the Beastie Boys – having relocated to Los Angeles – worked at their own G-Son studio, which gave them the latitude to jam and experiment at their leisure. They also launched their own imprint, the Capitol-distributed Grand Royal label.

For To the 5 Boroughs, they returned to their New York City roots, recording at their own studio in downtown Manhattan. In 2011, 25 years after the release of Licensed to Ill, the trio released Hot Sauce Committee Part Two, their eighth full-length album. The group that virtually invented rap-rock has maintained its relevance with cool grooves and razor-sharp rhymes with each release.

On May 4, 2012, Adam Yauch aka MCA died of cancer at age 47.

Source: Rock Roll Hall of Fame

- See more at: https://rockhall.com/inductees/beastie-boys/bio/#sthash.btR7sJvV.dpuf

 

Meet the first woman to play professional baseball in an all men's leagues - Toni Stone Tags: toni tomboy stone first woman professional baseball men leagues word life production new quality

Toni "Tomboy" Stone made history in 1953 when she joined the Negro Leagues, making her the first woman ever to play professionally in a men's league.

Female baseball player Toni Stone made history in 1953 when she was signed by the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro Leagues, making her the first woman ever to play professionally in a men's league. Stone began playing ball when she was only 10 years old. Over the years, many people tried to dissuaded her from the game, including her husband. After baseball, she worked as a nurse. She died in 1996.

Early Life

Born Marcenia Lyle Stone on July 17, 1921, in St. Paul, Minnesota, Toni "Tomboy" Stone made history in 1953 when she was signed to play second base for the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro Leagues, making her the first woman to play professionally in a men's league.

Stone's parents believed strongly that their four children needed to get a good education. But their athletically inclined daughter didn't share the same talent in the classroom as her siblings. Instead, she loved to compete, and excelled in all kinds of sports including ice skating, track, and the high jump. Baseball, however, was her true love and she spent her off-hours at a local park, soaking up the culture and devoting hours toward improving her own game.

Her parents didn't approve. Around the time she was 10 years old, Stone was forced to sit down with a local priest, whom her parents had invited over in hopes that he could talk their daughter out of her interest in baseball. Instead, toward the end of the sit-down, Father Keith asked Stone to play on his team in the Catholic Midget League.

At age 15, Stone was quietly earning a reputation as something of a phenom. She played with the Twin City Colored Giants, a traveling men's baseball club, and took to the diamond for clubs competing in the men's meatpacking league.

Playing for the San Francisco Sea Lions

In the 1940s, Stone moved to San Francisco to help a sick sister. It was there that her life began to finally change in the way she'd long hoped. But it was a humble start. She would later claim that she had only 50 cents in her pocket upon her arrival, and after staying in the bus station for several nights, she started to scrape together a living by working at a cafeteria and at a shipyard as a forklift operator.

Stone also began what can only be considered a personal reinvention. She changed her name to Toni Stone and dropped 10 years off her age to increase her appeal to a men's team.

It wasn't long before she was playing baseball again, signing on to play with an American Legion club. In 1949, she joined the San Francisco Sea Lions of the West Coast Negro Baseball League. The pay wasn't terrible (about $200 a month) and it enhanced Stone's exposure to high profile managers and team owners.

But it wasn't always an easy life. As a woman, Stone was subject to a barrage of insults from fans and sometimes even teammates who objected to seeing a female compete in a "men's" game. The complicated rules surrounding Jim Crow America only amplified the pressure, as she and other black players had to be careful not to patron white-only restaurants and other establishments.

The Indianapolis Clowns and Kansas City Monarchs

Still, Stone's talent was hard to miss. In 1953, she caught her big break when the Indianapolis Clowns signed her to its roster. The club, which had at one time developed a reputation as a showy kind of team, not unlike what basketball's Harlem Globetrotters would become, was in need of a boost.

Since Jackie Robinson's first appearance in the Majors in 1947, the Negro Leagues had seen attendance and talent drop considerably. The departures included the Clowns' prized second baseman, Hank Aaron. In the wake of all this upheaval, team owner Syd Pollack figured Stone might draw some fans.

Stone, however, played hard and didn't back down from any challenges that came her way. Backed by some pretty good Clowns PR to showcase their new female player, Stone appeared in 50 games that year, hitting a respectable .243—a stretch that included getting a hit off the legendary pitcher, Satchel Paige. She also got the chance to play with some excellent young talent, including Willie Mays and Ernie Banks.

But for Stone, she was a part of the roster and she wasn't. The fact that she was a woman meant that she wasn't allowed in the men's locker rooms. Her opponents showed little deference, either, sometimes coming hard at her on a slide with their spikes pointed up.

Stone's time with the Clowns was short. In the off-season, she was traded to the Kansas City Monarchs. It proved to be a difficult adjustment for her. Age had finally caught up to the fleet-footed Stone, and her new teammates and bosses resented her. At the end of the year, she retired.

Final Years

Toni Stone, who married Aurelious Alberga in 1950, a well-known San Francisco political player who was some 40 years her senior, spent her retirement life in Oakland. Eventually she earned the respect she'd long deserved from the baseball world. In 1993 she was inducted into the Women's Sports Hall of Fame in Long Island, New York.

Toni Stone died of heart and respiratory problems on November 2, 1996, at the age of 75, at an Alameda, California, nursing home.

Source: Biorgraphy.com

The Fat Boys are one of the most classic hip hop groups of all time!
Category: Classic Hip Hop
Tags: fat boy classic hip.hop era old school word life production feature blog

Originally known as The Disco Three, these large boys were discovered at a 1983 talent show at Radio City Music Hall.  First Prize at the contest included a recording contract.

The Disco Three were protégés of Kurtis Blow , who produced some of their recordings, but it was their manager Charles Stettler who, after being presented with an inflated hotel food bill for the group suggested they change their name to the Fat Boys.  The next single “Fat Boys” was highly successful and thus spawned the permanent name change that coincided with the release of “Fat Boys” on Sutra in 1984.

The followed that up with “The Fat Boys are Back” in 1985 and “Big & Beautiful” in 1986.

After making their big screen debut in the film Krush Groove, they went on to star in their own comedy vehicle Disorderlies.

Finally after recording three albums they scored their biggest hits doing remakes of older songs on their fourth album “Crushin” in 1987.  For their “Wipeout” remake, they were backed by The Beach Boys and Chubby Checker joined them for the remake of his classic “The Twist.”

In 1988 they released “On and On” but it was not well received.

Prince Markie Dee has gone on to do some solo work scoring minor hits in the 90′s.

Since leaving the Fat Boys, Prince Markie Dee has excelled as a producer involved in projects with many artists, including Mary J. Blige, Fifty-Cent, Jennifer Lopez, and many others.

Sadly, Darren Robinson died of a heart attack in December of 1995.

Official Site – http://www.originalfatboys.com/ Source: Old School Hip Hop

Best Christmas Album- Boyz II Men’s Christmas Interpretations
Category: Voices of Jazz
Tags: best christmas ablum.boyz II men word life production feature weekly blog

Boyz II Men followed their hugely successful debut, Cooleyhighharmony, with Christmas Interpretations, which is a pretty intelligent choice, given that Christmas albums by established artists tend to sell year after year, while pop albums tend to sell mostly at the time of their popularity. So this album of all new Christmas material (written by the Boyz themselves) certainly helped the Boyz flesh out their catalog. There aren't any interpretations of Christmas classics to be found on this record, save for their a cappella rendition of "Silent Night." This album is pure, lushly produced quiet storm and, because of the lack of traditional favorites, could be played at any time of year. This set differs from typical Boyz II Men albums in that it's very subdued, and vocal histrionics are kept at a minimum. This set also differs from traditional Christmas albums in that the songs generally deal with more melancholy subject matter, such as depression and suffering ("Why Christmas") and loneliness and poverty ("Cold December Nights"). It's also balanced with songs about the joys of giving (the elegant "Share Love," "Do They Know") and, of course, love ("You're Not Alone," "Who Would Have Thought"). This set also features "Let It Snow," a Top 40 duet with maestro Brian McKnight, who co-produced nearly every song on this album (it should have been titled Boyz II Men featuring Brian McKnight). This set is a cozy, velvety, and hip quiet storm Christmas album with touches of jazz, nostalgia, and melancholy but, at times, one yearns to hear the Boyz' lush harmonies wrapped around traditional favorites. Nonetheless, a nice chapter in the saga that is Boyz II Men.

Source: All Music

Aerosmith are the bad boys of Boston & America's greatest Rock & Roll Band Tags: aero smith bad boys boston america's greatest rock roll band ultimate rock classic word

Known for an aggressively rhythmic style as rooted in James Brown funk as in more traditional blues, Aerosmith were the top American hard-rock band of the mid-Seventies; if you set foot in a high school parking lot back then, the verbose back-alley numbers on 1975's Toys In The Attic and 1976's Rocks were inescapable. But the members' growing drug problems and internal dissension contributed to a commercial decline that accelerated through the late Seventies and early Eighties. Two crucial lineup changes and a few poorly received albums preceded a 1984 reunion of the original lineup and the multi-platinum Permanent Vacation, which signaled one of the most spectacular comebacks in rock history. Though by this time they were presenting themselves as vociferous adherents to the sober lifestyle, Aerosmith retained much of their bad-boy image. And despite a considerably more commercially slick and power-ballad oriented sound than they'd first emerged with, frequently drawing on outside songwriters, they managed to became even more popular the second time around.

Aerosmith was formed in 1970 by Joe Perry, Tom Hamilton and Steven Tyler, who was then a drummer. The group was completed with drummer Joey Kramer and Brad Whitford; Tyler, with his trademark high shriek, became lead singer. For the next two years all five members shared a small apartment in Boston and played almost nightly throughout the area, occasionally venturing to New York City. Clive Davis saw the band perform at Max's Kansas City in New York and signed them to Columbia. A minor hit and future FM-radio staple from their debut, "Dream On," strengthened their regional following.

Meanwhile, Aerosmith began to tour widely. In 1976 "Dream On" recharted, rising to Number Six. And by the time of "Walk This Way" (Number 10, 1977), the band had become headliners. Its phenomenal success was short-lived, however. A series of sold-out tours and platinum albums hit its peak in 1976.

By 1977 the group's constant touring and its members' heavy drug use (Perry and Tyler were nicknamed "the Toxic Twins" for their substance abuse) had begun to take their toll. After months of rest, Aerosmith recorded Draw the Line and appeared as the villains in Robert Stigwood's movie Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Their version of Lennon and McCartney's "Come Together" from the soundtrack was a minor hit. But Aerosmith was unraveling: In 1979, admitting to long-standing personality and musical conflicts with songwriting partner Tyler, Perry quit and started a band called the Joe Perry Project. Jim Crespo took his place. The next year Whitford departed to form the Whitford/St. Holmes band with ex—Ted Nugent sidekick Derek St. Holmes and was replaced by Rick Dufay. Neither Perry's nor Whitford's records sold particularly well.

Rock in a Hard Place, Aerosmith's first new recording in almost three years and the first without Perry, peaked at Number 32 in 1982. But in early 1984 the five original members met backstage at an Aerosmith concert and decided to re-form. Done With Mirrors, their first "comeback" LP, sold moderately. But he group's re-ascendance began in earnest when Aerosmith collaborated with Run-D.M.C. on the duo's hip-hop version of the 1975 Aerosmith warhorse "Walk This Way." That fall, just as "Walk This Way" was peaking at Number Four on the pop chart, Permanent Vacation (Number 11, 1987) was released. The album wound up spawning three hit singles, while the songs' videos introduced Aerosmith to the MTV generation. Aerosmith further consolidated its success with the critically acclaimed, quadruple-platinum Pump (Number Five, 1989), which boasted three Top 10 hits. "Janie's Got a Gun" (Number Four, 1989), about a teenage girl getting revenge for incestuous molestation by her father, won 1990's Grammy for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocal.

In 1991 the group signed a record deal with Sony worth a reported $30 million for four albums. Three years later, in summer 1994, Aerosmith landed a seven-figure deal from G.P. Putnam's Sons for their group autobiography. With the hit ballads "Living on the Edge" (Number 18, 1993), "Cryin" (Number 12, 1993) and "Crazy" (Number Seven, 1993) ubiquitous on MTV, Get a Grip hit Number One, followed by 1994's double-platinum Number Six greatest-hits package, Big Ones.

But Aerosmith soon re-entered rougher waters. The band started working on the follow-up to Get a Grip, but didn't get along with producer Glen Ballard, who left in the middle of the sessions and was replaced by Kevin Shirley. Meanwhile, Joey Kramer's father had died, sending the drummer into such a depression that he had to be replaced by session drummer Steve Ferrone on some tracks. In the midst of it all, the band fired its longtime manager, Tim Collins, who had helped the musicians through sobriety and helmed their Eighties comeback. Collins retaliated by suggesting that some of the band members had fallen off the wagon; Tyler was then accused of "not being part of the team" in a letter sent to him by his four bandmates. Tyler denied taking drugs, insisting, "I've had no mood-altering substances in 10 years."

When Nine Lives finally came out in 1997, it entered the chart at Number One. And though the album didn't yield a major hit single, "Pink" (Number 27, 1998) earned Aerosmith another Grammy, for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocal. In 1998, "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing", Aerosmith's contribution to the soundtrack of Armageddon (which starred Tyler's daughter Liv), became a Number One pop hit, and was nominated for an Academy Award. In early 2001, Aerosmith was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, just as the band's new album, Just Push Play (Number Two, 2001) scored with the powerpoppish hit single "Jaded" (Number Seven, 2001).

O, Yeah! The Ultimate Aerosmith Hits (Number Four, 2002) was the first best-of collection to combine music from the band's Columbia and Geffen tenures. Tours with the likes of Kiss and Kid Rock followed, as did Honkin' on Bobo (Number Five, 2004), an album of blues covers that was certified gold in the U.S, despite its ill-advised title. In 2006, though, two members of the band fell ill: Tyler announced that he had ruptured blood vessels in his larynx, while Hamilton disclosed that he was being treated for throat cancer. Both recovered, though Hamilton missed much of the band's 2006 tour. Nonetheless, in 2007, the band performed one of its most geographically extensive tours ever, traveling to countries like Russia and Latvia for the first time in its career

When the band went on the road again in 2009, the tour hit a number of snags, as Whitford and Hamilton recovered from surgery and Tyler from a leg injury. In August 2009, Tyler fell off a stage in South Dakota, damaging his back and neck; he was taken to the hospital, and the show was canceled. Within a few days, the rest of the tour was called off as well, though select concerts were performed later in the year. Rumors circulated in November 2009 about Tyler leaving the band, but this speculation was scuttled when he joined Perry for a performance of "Walk This Way" in New York that month.

Tyler entered rehab shortly after the surprise appearance, and in May 2010 Aerosmith launched another world tour — even though their most recent album was now nearly a decade in the past. Toward the end of the tour, word surfaced that Tyler was signed to be a judge on American Idol. In typical Aerosmith fashion, the rest of the band first learned about it from news reports. "It's one step above Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles," a furious Perry told the press. "I don't want Aerosmith's name involved with it." In early 2011, Aerosmith (sans Perry) cut a series of demos for a possible new album. At the same time, however, Tyler continued work on his solo debut — leaving the future of the band as murky as ever.

Portions of this biography appeared in The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll (Simon & Schuster, 2001). Chuck Eddy contributed to this article.



Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/artists/aerosmith/biography#ixzz2fjnQhZCv
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

RSS
Spread the word
Search

This website is powered by Spruz