Tagged with "brown"
Tina Turner; Barry White; Sly Stone; O'jays; Marvin Gaye; James Brown, etc. Tags: video month live entertainment sly stone barry white tina turner ojays marvin gaye james

Maurette Brown-Clark - The Dream Tags: dream maurette brown clark true worship music word life production new quality music

Maurette Brown-Clark, Gospel’s newly crowned “Princess of Praise & Worship” has been blessing the world with her soul stirring, heart felt alto voice since 1990. The journey that lead this thirty-something year old wife, mother of three, to her third album, The Dream, began while growing up in Long Island, New York.

One of four children (one sister and two brothers), Brown-Clark was raised by two music loving parents in a household steeped in Jesus, the church, love of family, and the power of music as a ministry.

Little did her parents know that having her sing with her siblings in the family group, and making sure Brown-Clark took piano lessons would be the foundation of a recording career and life’s ministry for this singer, songwriter, and producer.

Maurette Brown - Clark was musically influenced by her parents and some of New York’s greatest gospel artists, including one who lived just two towns over, Pastor Donnie McClurkin. Brown-Clark says, “He would come over to our church Little Zion and I would be mesmerized.... just blown away! I was a teenager back then...didn’t know it...couldn’t quite put my finger on it...but it was the anointing. And I knew that’s what I wanted. How Donnie was affecting me, that’s how I want to affect people. Although, I was later influenced by CeCe Winans and my mentor, Richard Smallwood, Donnie affected the way that I wanted to live for Jesus, through my music.”

After graduating from high school, Brown-Clark furthered her studies and graduated from the University of Maryland. At this point she began to question her life and reason for existing. She pondered, “I went to college, I did okay, I’ve got my degree in business, I’m working, got a piece of car, got a piece of an apartment…life is good! And then I thought, ‘This can’t be everything.’ I just started looking at my mortality. I asked myself, ‘What do I want to leave behind? Why am I here now?’ Now, sixteen years later, I truly believe that it is for His glory. I’ve realized that I have one life to live and I’m here to try to win souls for Christ. And the best way that I know how to do that is through my music. Before it was just something to do...now it is a calling and a passion.”

Recognizing the calling God had placed on her life, she remained in the Baltimore area after college singing as a solo artist. Word quickly spread about this petite gifted singer with a unique, strong alto voice, armed with a powerful conviction for Christ. During this time she didn’t have a recording contract, but held that desire in her heart and began honing her craft, singing wherever she could minister, networking and producing a demo tape. She knew that all things happen in God’s own time, not hers.

While singing in the Baltimore and Washington, DC area, she would see international gospel recording artist Richard Smallwood at events. There was talk in gospel circles that Smallwood had a dream about a choir he was inspired by God to put together and they would record with him. Also that he dreamed every individual member of it. A friend told

Maurette Brown-Clark

The Dream pg. 2

Brown-Clark that she was one of the choir members that appeared in Smallwood’s dream and that he was looking for her. She says, “My friend told me, ‘Richard Smallwood is looking for you....here’s his number, call him.’ I was like, ‘Yeah, right...do I owe him money?’ But I nervously dialed the number...And I went to that first rehearsal. He’s been stuck with me ever since!”

After she recorded with Vision (Smallwood’s group) and gained notoriety for her anointed performance as co-lead on their classic song, “Angels,” labels took notice. She soon signed her first major deal with Verity Records and released her debut solo project, How I Feel in 1998. It spawned the hit, “Breaking of Day.” Shortly after, Verity Records released her from its roster; Ironically, She received a Stellar Award for that project. It would be a few years before she signed with Atlanta International Records (AIR Gospel) and recorded another studio album, By His Grace, which was released in 2002. Disappointment loomed again. By His Grace met with critical acclaim, but didn’t reach the heights the label had expected. In her heart she knew it didn’t capture all of her. And for the second time, she was facing the possibility of being released. An executive at AIR Gospel believed so much in her that he went to bat for her with the owner and convinced him to give her another chance to record a CD her way, live, and with some of the best writers and a top producer.

It all came to fruition on September 17, 2004 when she recorded the highly anticipated, The Dream, her third album, at the Empowerment Church, in Baltimore, Maryland. There were technical problems at the live recording which resulted in the air conditioning being turned off in a packed house with over 2,000 people sitting there, sweating and fanning, yet staying glued to the edge of their seats as Brown-Clark fought through the adversities and blessed the crowd with the fire in her soul on anointed song after song. Brown-Clark says, “I just feel like the enemy was allowed to take his best shot the night of the recording...the power went out...and he’s been taking his best shot the entire few years since the recording and I just hope that I’ve been found waiting right.”

Brown-Clark was eagerly anticipating The Dream’s release in 2005 when another major career twist hit her. Atlanta International Records (AIR Gospel) was acquired by the Malaco Music Group & Select-O-Hits. She found herself with yet another label, this time with her most personal and prized project to date in the palms of another set of hands. Brown-Clark says, “I’ve had health challenges, label challenges, my third record with a third record label. So I’ve had to explain to three sets of people who Maurette is, what my vision is...and hoping that they catch my vision.”

Maurette Brown-Clark

The Dream pg. 3

God’s favor is still shining on Brown-Clark and her hopes are high being at her new label home, Malaco. A label that gets her and the vision she has for The Dream.

The Dream is a 13 song powerful CD that was produced by top gospel producer Asaph Ward (Kim Burrell, Men of Standard, Dorinda Clark-Cole, Evelyn Turrentine Agee, The Tommies). It features four songs written by Brown-Clark, the Richard Smallwood penned Praise and Worship song, “Lord We Praise Your Name” and a re-make of the Donnie McClurkin & New York Restoration Choir classic, “We Worship You.” Other writers on the project include hit making Stellar Award winning writer Jonathan Nelson (“Healed” by Donald Lawrence), Anthony and Eddie Brown. Brown-Clark says, “I wrote some of the songs and then I went out to other artists and songwriters that I knew, loved, and that wrote my heart. They wrote as if they were up in my house living with me...hanging out with me. And so I feel like I literally wrote all of the songs.”

The Dream’s title track has special meaning to Brown-Clark because it embodies God’s calling, the purpose of her life, and a dream she had in the 1990s that showed her leading others to Christ through her music ministry.

The Dream is myriad of Gospel music styles, crossing denominational lines and is poised to cross the lines of Gospel and Christian radio formats. Its inspiring music ranges from Praise and Worship, Contemporary Gospel, Contemporary Christian , to Jazz infused songs, and of course Traditional Gospel, all purposely recorded to touch a heart, inspire a life and lead a soul to Christ.

Brown-Clark says, “This CD is user friendly, just like the Internet, for whoever listens to it. The songs on The Dream are for everybody. But they are going to hit you differently at different points in your life depending on what you’re going through.”

Whether it’s, the upbeat first single and anthem of praise, “One God,” the moving title track “The Dream”, or the soul stirring song that encourages anyone who ever felt like giving up, “It Ain’t Over,” the rock tinged “Has God Done Anything For You?” the down home church tune, “Sovereign God,” and soon to be Sunday School and Children’s choir favorite, “I Am What God Says I Am” featuring Brown-Clark’s six year old daughter Jada, or her jazzy version of the church classic, “I Have Decided To Follow Jesus.” The Dream will uplift you wherever you are.

Written by Lin. Woods

Source: Malaco Records

The Reality behind the crack Era-New Jack City Tags: new jack city reality crack ere nino brown ice t word life production classic

New Jack City is a 1991 American crime film directed by Mario Van Peebles in his directorial debut, who also co-stars in the film. The film stars Wesley Snipes, Ice T, Allen Payne, Chris Rock and Judd Nelson. The film was released in the United States on March 8, 1991.

Wesley Snipes played Nino Brown, a rising drug dealer and crime lord in New York City during the crack epidemic. Ice T played Scotty Appleton, a detective who vows to stop Nino's criminal activity by going undercover to work for Nino's gang.

The film is based on the crack cocaine war in the USA. It was the first theatrically released film for director and co-star Mario Van Peebles. The film was based upon an original story and screenplay written by Thomas Lee Wright who had previously penned a draft of The Godfather Part III and would go on to write, direct and produce a seminal documentary of American gang life, Eight Tray Gangster: The Making of a Crip.

The screenplay was co-written by journalist turned screenwriter Barry Michael Cooper, who also scripted 1994's Above the Rim, and Sugar Hill, which also starred Snipes. Cooper is the first African American screenwriter in history to have two films produced in one year:[citation needed] Sugar Hill was released on February 25, 1994 by Beacon-20th Century Fox Pictures, and Above The Rim was released on March 23, 1994 by New Line Cinema.

Barry Michael Cooper's rewrite was based on a December 1987 The Village Voice cover story written by Cooper titled "Kids Killing Kids: New Jack City Eats Its Young".The story revolved around the 20th anniversary of the 1967 riots in Detroit, and in its wake, Nicky Barnes, rise of crack cocaine gangs in the late 1980s, such as Young Boys Inc., and the Chambers Brothers.

Nino Brown (Wesley Snipes) and his gang, the Cash Money Brothers, become the dominant drug ring in New York City, once crack cocaine is introduced to the streets, during the late 1980s. Undercover detective Scotty Appleton (Ice T) strikes a deal with stick-up kid, Pookie (Chris Rock). The deal takes a wrong turn when Pookie takes the money and runs off, causing Scotty to have a long chase. He wounds Pookie with his gun and attempts to arrest him, but the police let him go.

Meanwhile, Nino plots a plan to turn an entire apartment complex (real life Graham Court, known in the film as the "Carter") into a crack house, with the assistance of his best friend/right-hand, Gee Money (Allen Payne), enforcer, Duh Duh Duh Man (Bill Nunn), gangstress Keisha (Vanessa A. Williams), Nino's girlfriend, Selina (Michael Michele), and her tech-savy cousin, Kareem Akbar (Christopher Williams). Gee Money and Keisha take out Rastafarian rival, Fat Smitty, while Nino forces the Carter's landlord out into the streets, naked.

After Det. Stone (Mario Van Peebles)--leader of the team tasked with taking down the CMB--is put under pressure by the Police Commissioner, Scotty volunteers to go undercover and infiltrate Nino's gang. He is partnered with loose-cannon, Nick Peretti (Judd Nelson), as they try to convict the gang with evidence of drug trafficking. Elsewhere, Frankie Needles (Anthony DeSando) pays Nino a visit to deliver him a message from mob boss Don Armeteo (John Aprea), who taxes the CMB. Nino scornfully calls for Needles to rely a message back to the Don that he's cutting off taxing him, and that CMB is an independent operation.

While he and Nick are spying on Nino and his crew as they hand out Thanksgiving turkeys to the poor, Scotty spots Pookie, now a crack fiend. He tracks him down just as Pookie was in the middle of beating his junkie girlfriend over the turkey he brought back. Instead of arresting him, Scotty puts Pookie in rehab for his drug addiction. After completing treatment, Pookie wants to return the favor and help Scotty bring down Nino. Against his better judgment, as well the strong disapproval of Stone and Peretti, Scotty recruits Pookie to work undercover at the Carter, gathering incriminating evidence against Nino and the Cash Money Brothers.

However, Pookie ends up relapsing and sneaking drugs. While high, Pookie is caught by Gee Money, who also realizes that he is wired. When the cops realize their cover has been blown, the CMB abandon and burn the Carter complex, including any evidence of their activities with the crack addicted civilians inside. Later, the cops try to reach Pookie, but they find his bloody corpse attached with explosives. Nick defuses the explosives mere seconds before they explode. Meanwhile, when Nino discovers that Gee Money ordered the Carter to be destroyed, he vehemently threatens him to never make a costly mistake again.

After Pookie's funeral, Scotty and Nick take matters into their own hands by going undercover as a drug dealers wanting to do business with Gee Money. Scotty infiltrates the CMB--thanks in part to the ambitions (and increasing drug use) of Gee Money--after they bribe Frankie Needles. Nino doesn't trust Gee Money's new clientele, but agrees to do business with Scotty, warning Gee that if Scotty isn't who he claims, he'll kill the both of them. On their first encounter, Nino tells Scotty a story of how he murdered a school teacher as a part of his initiation into a gang called the L.A. Boyz, as a youth. When questioned by Scotty if the murder was personal or business, Nino explains this away by saying: "My brother, it's always business. Never personal." Scotty further gains the trust of Nino after "saving" him from a gun-toting old man (Bill Cobbs)--who earlier, tried to convince the police of Nino's destruction of the community--and by revealing information about Gee Money's side deal.

While Nino, Scotty and the CMB attend a wedding, Nick sneaks into Nino's mansion to collect the video tapes from the Carter drug operations, in order to gather evidence of Pookie's death and the drugs. After the wedding, Don Armeteo sends hitman to assassinate Nino. A massive shootout erupts between the CMB and the hitters. After witnessing Nino use a little girl as a shield to protect himself, Scotty attempts to shoot Nino behind his back. Keisha is gunned down as she sprays a hail of bullets into the van the shooters escape in. Later, Selina condemns Nino for his murderous activities and Nino throws her out. Don Armeteo calls Nino to taunt him, explaining that he "needed to be spanked" for his arrogance. Nino threatens him before the Don hangs up. Later, he opens fire on Don Armeteo and his henchman from the back of a speeding motorcycle, killing them all.

Scotty and Nick meet with Stone to arrange a sting operation to nab Nino, once and for all. But at the sting, Scotty's cover is blown by Kareem, who just happened to be at the scene the day Scotty wounded Pookie. A shootout ensues; Nick saves Scotty by killing the Duh Duh Duh Man, before he could open fire on him. Nino manages to escape. That night, he confronts Gee Money for his act of betrayal. Gee accuses Nino of being egotistical, and putting himself over what they built together. Gee wants things to go back to the way they were, but Nino sees no going back, and regretfully kills him.

After the gang's collapse, Nino holes himself up in an apartment and continues his criminal empire, solo. Scotty and Nick infiltrate the complex, with Nick taking out Nino's guards and Scotty crashing into Nino's apartment. Nino is brutally beaten by Scotty, who reveals that the school teacher Nino killed was his mother. For his crimes against the community, as well as his mother's murder, Scotty attempts to kill Nino again, but Nick gets him to put down the gun. As a bloodied Nino is taken into custody, he warns Scotty that he'll be out in a week and that he's a dead man.

At his trial, Nino pleads guilty to a lesser charge and turns state's evidence, falsely claiming that he was forced to work for the CMB because they threatened to kill his mother and pointing the finger at Kareem as the actual leader of CMB. Because his punishment would include at least 12 months prison time, Nino gets only a year in prison, which leaves Scotty outraged. But as he's speaking with reporters outside of the courtroom, Nino is greeted by the old man (who tried to kill him earlier) who says "Idolator! Your soul is required in hell!"; the old man then shoots Nino in the chest. Scotty and Nick are both satisfied, as Nino falls over the balcony to his death. As onlookers look down at Nino's body, an epilogue states to the viewers that "Although this is a fictional story, there are Nino Browns in every major city in America. If we don't confront the problem realistically--without empty slogans and promises--then drugs will continue to destroy our country."

Source: Wikipedia

James Brown will always be remembered as the God Father of Soul and the hardest working man in show business Tags: james brown god father soul music hall fame word life production feature blog

James Brown had more honorifics attached to his name than any other performer in music history. He was variously tagged “Soul Brother Number One,” “the Godfather of Soul,” “the Hardest Working Man in Show Business,” “Mr. Dynamite” and even “the Original Disco Man.” This much is certain: what became known as soul music in the Sixties, funk music in the Seventies and rap music in the Eighties is directly attributable to James Brown. His transformation of gospel fervor into the taut, explosive intensity of rhythm & blues, combined with precision choreography and dynamic showmanship, served to define the directions black music would take from the release of his first R&B hit ("Please Please Please") in 1956 to the present day.

Brown’s life history documents one triumph over adversity after another. He was born into poverty in Barnwell, South Carolina, during the Great Depression. As a child, he picked cotton, danced for spare change and shined shoes. At 16, he was caught and convicted of stealing, and he landed in reform school for three years. While incarcerated, he met Bobby Byrd, leader of a gospel group that performed at the prison. After his release, Brown tried his hand at semipro boxing and baseball. A career-ending leg injury inspired him to pursue music fulltime. He joined Byrd in a group that sang gospel in and around Toccoa, Georgia. But then Byrd and Brown attended a rhythm & blues revue that included Hank Ballard and Fats Domino, whose performances lured them into the realm of secular music. Renaming themselves the Flames (later, the Famous Flames), they became a tightly knit ensemble that showcased their abundant talents as singers, dancers and multi-instrumentalists.

Brown rose to the fore as leader of the James Brown Revue – an entourage complete with emcee, dancers and an untouchable stage band (the J.B.’s). Reportedly sweating off up to seven pounds a night, Brown was a captivating performer who’d incorporate a furious regimen of spins, drops and shtick (such as feigning a heart attack, complete with the ritual donning and doffing of capes and a fevered return to the stage) into his skintight rhythm & blues. What Elvis Presley was to rock and roll, James Brown became to R&B: a prolific and dominant phenom. Like Presley, he is a three-figure hitmaker, with 114 total entries on Billboard’s R&B singles charts and 94 that made the Hot 100 singles chart. Over the years, he amassed 800 songs in his repertoire while maintaining a grueling touring schedule. Recording for the King and Federal labels throughout the Fifties and Sixties, Brown distilled R&B to its essence on such classic albums as Live at the Apollo (patterned after Ray CharlesIn Person) and singles like “Cold Sweat,” “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag” and “I Got You (I Feel Good).” His group, the J.B.’s, was anchored by horn players and musical mainstays Fred Wesley and Maceo Parker. Brown also recorded a series of instrumental albums, taking a break from soul shouting to pursue his prowess as an organist.

By the late Sixties, Brown had attained the status of a musical and cultural revolutionary, owing to his message of black pride and self-sufficiency. In the late Sixties and early Seventies, such message songs as “Say It Loud - I’m Black and I’m Proud” reverberated throughout the black community, within which he was regarded as a leader and role model. During this time, he began developing a hot funk sound with young musicians, such as bassist William “Bootsy” Collins, who passed through his ever-evolving band. Although his influence waned in the latter half of the Seventies, a cameo role in The Blues Brothers film in 1980 and his recognition as a forefather of rap helped trigger a resurgence. His records were more heavily sampled by rap and hip-hop acts than those of any other artist, and he achieved renewed street credibility by recording a single ("Unity") with rapper Afrika Bambaataa in 1984. Brown was among the first group of performers inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986. Unfortunately, his personal life took a nose-dive in 1988, as he was investigated on a series of charges that ranged from spousal abuse and drug possession to problems with the IRS. Paroled after serving two years in prison, a chastened but resolute Brown picked up the pieces in the Nineties and carried on.

If nothing else, his status as the Godfather of Soul remained unassailable. In December 2003, shortly after his 70th birthday, James Brown was the recipient of the prestigious Kennedy Center Honors. Brown performed through much of 2006 during his Seven Decades of Funk world tour. He died of heart failure resulting from pneumonia on Christmas Day 2006. In the following days, public memorial services attracting thousands of fans were held at New York's Apollo Theater and the James Brown Arena in Augusta, Georgia, his hometown.

Source: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

James Brown had more honorifics attached to his name than any other performer in music history. He was variously tagged “Soul Brother Number One,” “the Godfather of Soul,” “the Hardest Working Man in Show Business,” “Mr. Dynamite” and even “the Original Disco Man.” This much is certain: what became known as soul music in the Sixties, funk music in the Seventies and rap music in the Eighties is directly attributable to James Brown. His transformation of gospel fervor into the taut, explosive intensity of rhythm & blues, combined with precision choreography and dynamic showmanship, served to define the directions black music would take from the release of his first R&B hit ("Please Please Please") in 1956 to the present day.

Brown’s life history documents one triumph over adversity after another. He was born into poverty in Barnwell, South Carolina, during the Great Depression. As a child, he picked cotton, danced for spare change and shined shoes. At 16, he was caught and convicted of stealing, and he landed in reform school for three years. While incarcerated, he met Bobby Byrd, leader of a gospel group that performed at the prison. After his release, Brown tried his hand at semipro boxing and baseball. A career-ending leg injury inspired him to pursue music fulltime. He joined Byrd in a group that sang gospel in and around Toccoa, Georgia. But then Byrd and Brown attended a rhythm & blues revue that included Hank Ballard and Fats Domino, whose performances lured them into the realm of secular music. Renaming themselves the Flames (later, the Famous Flames), they became a tightly knit ensemble that showcased their abundant talents as singers, dancers and multi-instrumentalists.

Brown rose to the fore as leader of the James Brown Revue – an entourage complete with emcee, dancers and an untouchable stage band (the J.B.’s). Reportedly sweating off up to seven pounds a night, Brown was a captivating performer who’d incorporate a furious regimen of spins, drops and shtick (such as feigning a heart attack, complete with the ritual donning and doffing of capes and a fevered return to the stage) into his skintight rhythm & blues. What Elvis Presley was to rock and roll, James Brown became to R&B: a prolific and dominant phenom. Like Presley, he is a three-figure hitmaker, with 114 total entries on Billboard’s R&B singles charts and 94 that made the Hot 100 singles chart. Over the years, he amassed 800 songs in his repertoire while maintaining a grueling touring schedule. Recording for the King and Federal labels throughout the Fifties and Sixties, Brown distilled R&B to its essence on such classic albums as Live at the Apollo (patterned after Ray CharlesIn Person) and singles like “Cold Sweat,” “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag” and “I Got You (I Feel Good).” His group, the J.B.’s, was anchored by horn players and musical mainstays Fred Wesley and Maceo Parker. Brown also recorded a series of instrumental albums, taking a break from soul shouting to pursue his prowess as an organist.

By the late Sixties, Brown had attained the status of a musical and cultural revolutionary, owing to his message of black pride and self-sufficiency. In the late Sixties and early Seventies, such message songs as “Say It Loud - I’m Black and I’m Proud” reverberated throughout the black community, within which he was regarded as a leader and role model. During this time, he began developing a hot funk sound with young musicians, such as bassist William “Bootsy” Collins, who passed through his ever-evolving band. Although his influence waned in the latter half of the Seventies, a cameo role in The Blues Brothers film in 1980 and his recognition as a forefather of rap helped trigger a resurgence. His records were more heavily sampled by rap and hip-hop acts than those of any other artist, and he achieved renewed street credibility by recording a single ("Unity") with rapper Afrika Bambaataa in 1984. Brown was among the first group of performers inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986. Unfortunately, his personal life took a nose-dive in 1988, as he was investigated on a series of charges that ranged from spousal abuse and drug possession to problems with the IRS. Paroled after serving two years in prison, a chastened but resolute Brown picked up the pieces in the Nineties and carried on.

If nothing else, his status as the Godfather of Soul remained unassailable. In December 2003, shortly after his 70th birthday, James Brown was the recipient of the prestigious Kennedy Center Honors. Brown performed through much of 2006 during his Seven Decades of Funk world tour. He died of heart failure resulting from pneumonia on Christmas Day 2006. In the following days, public memorial services attracting thousands of fans were held at New York's Apollo Theater and the James Brown Arena in Augusta, Georgia, his hometown.

Source: Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

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