Tagged with "city"
The Reality behind the crack Era-New Jack City Tags: new jack city reality crack ere nino brown ice t word life production classic

New Jack City is a 1991 American crime film directed by Mario Van Peebles in his directorial debut, who also co-stars in the film. The film stars Wesley Snipes, Ice T, Allen Payne, Chris Rock and Judd Nelson. The film was released in the United States on March 8, 1991.

Wesley Snipes played Nino Brown, a rising drug dealer and crime lord in New York City during the crack epidemic. Ice T played Scotty Appleton, a detective who vows to stop Nino's criminal activity by going undercover to work for Nino's gang.

The film is based on the crack cocaine war in the USA. It was the first theatrically released film for director and co-star Mario Van Peebles. The film was based upon an original story and screenplay written by Thomas Lee Wright who had previously penned a draft of The Godfather Part III and would go on to write, direct and produce a seminal documentary of American gang life, Eight Tray Gangster: The Making of a Crip.

The screenplay was co-written by journalist turned screenwriter Barry Michael Cooper, who also scripted 1994's Above the Rim, and Sugar Hill, which also starred Snipes. Cooper is the first African American screenwriter in history to have two films produced in one year:[citation needed] Sugar Hill was released on February 25, 1994 by Beacon-20th Century Fox Pictures, and Above The Rim was released on March 23, 1994 by New Line Cinema.

Barry Michael Cooper's rewrite was based on a December 1987 The Village Voice cover story written by Cooper titled "Kids Killing Kids: New Jack City Eats Its Young".The story revolved around the 20th anniversary of the 1967 riots in Detroit, and in its wake, Nicky Barnes, rise of crack cocaine gangs in the late 1980s, such as Young Boys Inc., and the Chambers Brothers.

Nino Brown (Wesley Snipes) and his gang, the Cash Money Brothers, become the dominant drug ring in New York City, once crack cocaine is introduced to the streets, during the late 1980s. Undercover detective Scotty Appleton (Ice T) strikes a deal with stick-up kid, Pookie (Chris Rock). The deal takes a wrong turn when Pookie takes the money and runs off, causing Scotty to have a long chase. He wounds Pookie with his gun and attempts to arrest him, but the police let him go.

Meanwhile, Nino plots a plan to turn an entire apartment complex (real life Graham Court, known in the film as the "Carter") into a crack house, with the assistance of his best friend/right-hand, Gee Money (Allen Payne), enforcer, Duh Duh Duh Man (Bill Nunn), gangstress Keisha (Vanessa A. Williams), Nino's girlfriend, Selina (Michael Michele), and her tech-savy cousin, Kareem Akbar (Christopher Williams). Gee Money and Keisha take out Rastafarian rival, Fat Smitty, while Nino forces the Carter's landlord out into the streets, naked.

After Det. Stone (Mario Van Peebles)--leader of the team tasked with taking down the CMB--is put under pressure by the Police Commissioner, Scotty volunteers to go undercover and infiltrate Nino's gang. He is partnered with loose-cannon, Nick Peretti (Judd Nelson), as they try to convict the gang with evidence of drug trafficking. Elsewhere, Frankie Needles (Anthony DeSando) pays Nino a visit to deliver him a message from mob boss Don Armeteo (John Aprea), who taxes the CMB. Nino scornfully calls for Needles to rely a message back to the Don that he's cutting off taxing him, and that CMB is an independent operation.

While he and Nick are spying on Nino and his crew as they hand out Thanksgiving turkeys to the poor, Scotty spots Pookie, now a crack fiend. He tracks him down just as Pookie was in the middle of beating his junkie girlfriend over the turkey he brought back. Instead of arresting him, Scotty puts Pookie in rehab for his drug addiction. After completing treatment, Pookie wants to return the favor and help Scotty bring down Nino. Against his better judgment, as well the strong disapproval of Stone and Peretti, Scotty recruits Pookie to work undercover at the Carter, gathering incriminating evidence against Nino and the Cash Money Brothers.

However, Pookie ends up relapsing and sneaking drugs. While high, Pookie is caught by Gee Money, who also realizes that he is wired. When the cops realize their cover has been blown, the CMB abandon and burn the Carter complex, including any evidence of their activities with the crack addicted civilians inside. Later, the cops try to reach Pookie, but they find his bloody corpse attached with explosives. Nick defuses the explosives mere seconds before they explode. Meanwhile, when Nino discovers that Gee Money ordered the Carter to be destroyed, he vehemently threatens him to never make a costly mistake again.

After Pookie's funeral, Scotty and Nick take matters into their own hands by going undercover as a drug dealers wanting to do business with Gee Money. Scotty infiltrates the CMB--thanks in part to the ambitions (and increasing drug use) of Gee Money--after they bribe Frankie Needles. Nino doesn't trust Gee Money's new clientele, but agrees to do business with Scotty, warning Gee that if Scotty isn't who he claims, he'll kill the both of them. On their first encounter, Nino tells Scotty a story of how he murdered a school teacher as a part of his initiation into a gang called the L.A. Boyz, as a youth. When questioned by Scotty if the murder was personal or business, Nino explains this away by saying: "My brother, it's always business. Never personal." Scotty further gains the trust of Nino after "saving" him from a gun-toting old man (Bill Cobbs)--who earlier, tried to convince the police of Nino's destruction of the community--and by revealing information about Gee Money's side deal.

While Nino, Scotty and the CMB attend a wedding, Nick sneaks into Nino's mansion to collect the video tapes from the Carter drug operations, in order to gather evidence of Pookie's death and the drugs. After the wedding, Don Armeteo sends hitman to assassinate Nino. A massive shootout erupts between the CMB and the hitters. After witnessing Nino use a little girl as a shield to protect himself, Scotty attempts to shoot Nino behind his back. Keisha is gunned down as she sprays a hail of bullets into the van the shooters escape in. Later, Selina condemns Nino for his murderous activities and Nino throws her out. Don Armeteo calls Nino to taunt him, explaining that he "needed to be spanked" for his arrogance. Nino threatens him before the Don hangs up. Later, he opens fire on Don Armeteo and his henchman from the back of a speeding motorcycle, killing them all.

Scotty and Nick meet with Stone to arrange a sting operation to nab Nino, once and for all. But at the sting, Scotty's cover is blown by Kareem, who just happened to be at the scene the day Scotty wounded Pookie. A shootout ensues; Nick saves Scotty by killing the Duh Duh Duh Man, before he could open fire on him. Nino manages to escape. That night, he confronts Gee Money for his act of betrayal. Gee accuses Nino of being egotistical, and putting himself over what they built together. Gee wants things to go back to the way they were, but Nino sees no going back, and regretfully kills him.

After the gang's collapse, Nino holes himself up in an apartment and continues his criminal empire, solo. Scotty and Nick infiltrate the complex, with Nick taking out Nino's guards and Scotty crashing into Nino's apartment. Nino is brutally beaten by Scotty, who reveals that the school teacher Nino killed was his mother. For his crimes against the community, as well as his mother's murder, Scotty attempts to kill Nino again, but Nick gets him to put down the gun. As a bloodied Nino is taken into custody, he warns Scotty that he'll be out in a week and that he's a dead man.

At his trial, Nino pleads guilty to a lesser charge and turns state's evidence, falsely claiming that he was forced to work for the CMB because they threatened to kill his mother and pointing the finger at Kareem as the actual leader of CMB. Because his punishment would include at least 12 months prison time, Nino gets only a year in prison, which leaves Scotty outraged. But as he's speaking with reporters outside of the courtroom, Nino is greeted by the old man (who tried to kill him earlier) who says "Idolator! Your soul is required in hell!"; the old man then shoots Nino in the chest. Scotty and Nick are both satisfied, as Nino falls over the balcony to his death. As onlookers look down at Nino's body, an epilogue states to the viewers that "Although this is a fictional story, there are Nino Browns in every major city in America. If we don't confront the problem realistically--without empty slogans and promises--then drugs will continue to destroy our country."

Source: Wikipedia

A Moment in History-Lewis Howard Latimer
Category: Black Men Rock!
Tags: lewis latimer history electricity word life production feature weekly blog black men rock

Lewis Howard Latimer was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, on September 4, 1848, to parents who had fled slavery. Latimer learned the art of mechanical drawing while working at a patent firm. Over the course of his career as a draftsman, Latimer worked closely with Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell, in addition to designing his own inventions. He died in Flushing, Queens, New York, on December 11, 1928.

Early Life and Family

Inventor and engineer Lewis Howard Latimer was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, on September 4, 1848. Latimer was the youngest of four children born to George and Rebecca Latimer, who had escaped from slavery in Virginia six years before his birth. Captured in Boston and brought to trial as a fugitive, George Latimer was defended by abolitionists Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison. He was eventually able to purchase his freedom, with the help of a local minister, and began raising a family with Rebecca in nearby Chelsea. George disappeared shortly after the Dred Scott decision in 1857, possibly fearing a return to slavery and the South.

Helping to Patent the Telephone & Light Bulb

After his father's departure, Lewis Latimer worked to help support his mother and family. In 1864, at the age of 16, Latimer lied about his age in order to enlist in the United States Navy during the Civil War. Returning to Boston after an honorable discharge, he accepted a menial position at the Crosby and Gould patent law office. He taught himself mechanical drawing and drafting by observing the work of draftsmen at the firm. Recognizing Latimer's talent and promise, the firm partners promoted him from office boy to draftsman. In addition to assisting others, Latimer designed a number of his own inventions, including an improved railroad car bathroom and an early air conditioning unit.

Latimer's talents were well-matched to the post-Civil War period, which saw a large number of scientific and engineering breakthroughs. Latimer was directly involved with one of these inventions: the telephone. Working with Alexander Graham Bell, Latimer helped draft the patent for Bell's design of the telephone. He was also involved in the field of incandescet lighting, a particularly competitive field, working for Hiram Maxim and Thomas Edison.

Latimer's deep knowledge of both patents and electrical engineering made Latimer an indispensible partner to Edison as he promoted and defended his light bulb design. In 1890, Latimer published a book entitled Incandescent Electric Lighting: A Practical Description of the Edison System. He continued to work as a patent consultant until 1922.

Personal Life and Death

Latimer married Mary Wilson in 1873, and they had two daughters together. The Latimers were active members of the Unitarian Church and Lewis Latimer was consistently involved in Civil War veterans groups, including the Grand Army of the Republic. In addition to his drafting skills, Latimer enjoyed other creative pastimes, including playing the flute and writing poetry and plays. In his spare time, he taught mechanical drawing and English to recent immigrants at the Henry Street Settlement in New York.

Lewis Howard Latimer died on December 11, 1928, in Flushing, Queens, New York. His wife, Mary,

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MUSIC IS JUST NOT MUSIC UNLESS YOU PUT YOUR SOUL INTO IT Tags: ill-iteracy's star city va underground hip hop music word life production

         Each born in Roanoke "Star City",VA. iLL-iteracy's members developed affinities for music early in their lives. Whether it was jam sessions in the basement or rocking the crowd at their high school football games, their talent and love for all things instrumental was obvious.  The group was officially formed circa 1998, but have known each other since about the age of six.  Beginning with tee-ball, the members had a close friendship with each other that only seemed to grow stronger as time went by.  This is a fact that many people find intriguing, as not too many people tend to have one best friend for so long, let alone an entourage of them.

        

        The group was formed in the Dudley Basement, which was only a half mile away from William Fleming High School where they all attended.  Honors classes, magnet programs, and an enthusiastic approach to learning undoubtedly had an effect on their appreciation for the art of music.  After school, each of the members would gather around a computer, a base-model plastic computer microphone, and a technologically inferior recording program just for kicks.  There was no mission in mind; no money-making scheme...  There was just music.

        The members of iLL-iteracy are Scott Dudley - "Chris Prythm", Kirk Dudley - "Speek Eazy", Corey English - "WiLL Spitwell", and George Trent -   "Young Observe". Now operating under the witty moniker "iLL-iteracy,"   they site influences such as God, each other, Roanoke City, prayerful mothers, scornful fathers, the loss of loved ones, and all the typical conditions that define an inner-city.  Their sound is inspirational but far from ignorantly blissful and their musical arsenal ranges from upbeat anthems to thought provoking, more conscious selections.


    'iLL-it' shows no indication of slowing down nor do they appear to be fatigued in spite of working day-jobs, earning college degrees, and managing families.  The phrase "due time" undoubtedly comes to mind when you factor in that the team writes, records and mixes all their own music. The group's determination shines through more recent ventures including "iLL-it Beatz," an integral section of the official website (www.iLL-it.com) that was created from beginning to end by Speek Eazy and Chris Prythm. "iLL-it Beatz" showcases and makes available quality, custom-fitted tracks for other artists to use in further sharpening of their respective crafts.  In an industry where 'one-hit-wonders' are prevalent, the individuals that make up iLL-iteracy are bound and determined to be anything but.  They continue to develop their skills on both the artist/producer and executive sides of the business in preparation for the opportunity that most never get. But that's the motivation that pushes them harder and fuels the hunger that so many others lack. A group holding no limits,  versatile with the ability to mesh with any genre, not following 'hype' or others, just the love and passion to make riLL music.

Ill-iteracy's Website: www.ill-it.com

THIS MONTH'S CELEBRITY PICK IS ONE OF BRICK CITY'S FINEST-REGGIE NOBLE Tags: reggie noble aka red man brick city featured artist word life


 

1990, Reginald "Reggie" Noble Encarnacion made his world debut on the EPMD album Business as Usual, appearing on tracks "Hardcore" and "Brothers On My Jock".

 

Whut? Thee Album & Dare Iz a Darkside (1990-1995) In 1992 Redman released his debut album, Whut? The Album, which Allmusic noted for blending "reggae and funk influences" with a "terse, though fluid rap style".[1] The album peaked at number forty-nine on the Billboard 200 and was certified gold. He was named "Rap Artist of the Year" by The Source. Redman followed this up with his 1994 album, Dare Iz a Darkside. The first single, "Rockafella", samples Leon Haywood's "I Want'a Do Something Freaky to You" and George Clinton's "Flashlight", two of the most sampled songs in hip hop. Redman's second album was notable for having most of the tracks produced by the artist himself (later on Redman would let other producers make most of his beats). It was also the last album that had any slight gangsta image of Redman, as he would tend to sound more comical and lyrical later on.[2]

 

 Muddy Waters (1996-1997)On December 10, 1996 Redman released his third album Muddy Waters, which was highly praised by critics.[3][4] The album featured two Billboard Hot 100 singles, "Whateva Man" and "It's Like That (My Big Brother)". The song "Do What You Feel" also appeared on the soundtrack to the popular video game Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories. The album was certified gold by the RIAA on February 12, 1997.

 

 El Niño, Doc's da Name 2000 & Blackout (1998-1999) In 1998 Redman released his first collaboration album El Niño with group Def Squad. His fourth studio album Doc's da Name 2000.[5] was a top seller, shipping platinum in sales and exceeding his previous record of gold. It peaked at #11 on The Billboard 200 and had three songs ("I'll Bee Dat", "Da Goodness", "Let Da Monkey Out") that charted. With his new formed close partnership with labelmate Method Man who, with him, made a featured appearance with the Dogg Pound in Tupac Shakur's 1996 album All Eyez on Me in the rap song Got My Mind made up, released the 1999 album Blackout! Originally the name of the album was Amerikaz Most Blunted and was advertised as that for months before the release, but they were forced to rename the album. The album has sold 1,575,000 copies to date.

 

 Malpractice (2001)Redman In 2001 released his fifth studio album Malpractice. It reached #4 on The Billboard 200 and was certified Gold by the RIAA on July 21, 2001.[6] It boasted two singles "Let's Get Dirty (I Can't Get In Da Club)" and "Smash Sumthin'".

 

 Mixtapes, Collaborations & Production (2002-2006)Since the release of Malpractice, he has kept his fans happy by independently releasing the Ill At Will mixtapes, which feature various members of his new record label Gilla House members under Redman's Gilla House imprint include Saukrates, Icarus, Ready Roc, E3, Young Heat, and Melanie.. Redman had his best-known international hit with Christina Aguilera, when he was featured on her 2002 single "Dirrty". Around this time he was also featured on a popular remix of Pink's track Get This Party Started. Under his birthname, Reggie Noble, Redman has done production for himself, many of his crew members, and even Shaquille O'Neal on his 'Shaq-Fu: Da Return' album.

 Red Gone Wild (2007-2008)In March 2007, Redman released Red Gone Wild. He says that the reason for the long wait to drop the album is because of the fast-changing pace of Hip Hop on his MySpace interview. On March 27, 2007 Redman confirmed on BET's Rap City: Tha Bassment that the sequel to How High, How High 2, is currently being written. In an April 10, 2007 Onion AV Club interview,[7] Redman hinted that there would be a second collaborative album with Method Man, with work beginning in midsummer or early September.

Blackout 2! & Reggie (2009-present) Blackout! 2 was announced in 2007 by Redman and was originally scheduled for release in 2008, but its release was pushed back a number of times due to numerous reasons. In early 2008, a remake of the Smoothe da Hustler and Trigger tha Gambler classic Broken Language was released to the internet by the duo entitled Broken Language 2008, fueling rumors of a Blackout! sequel coming soon. This rumor was further fueled by the duo while performing in Gainesville, FL at the University of Florida. A Blackout! LP was scheduled for a December 9, 2008 release but was recently pushed back to the first quarter of '09. It was finally released on May 19, 2009. It debuted at number #7 on the Billboard 200, at number 2 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums, at number 2 on the Top Rap Albums and digital in charted number 7 on the Digital Albums charts selling 63,000 copes its first week.[8] The album also charted number 10 on Canadian Albums. The album has sold 160,375 copies in the United States by December 12, 2009, according to SoundScan. In May 2009, Redman confirmed his next solo album would come out December, 2009. The title for the project is Reggie Noble "0" 9½.[9] The title of the album was then changed to just Redman Presents... Reggie, and three singles ("Coc Back", "Oh My", & "Money on My Mind") were released. The first single "Coc Back" (which features Ready Roc) had music video filmed and released for it. But as it turns out, none of the tracks made the final cut of the album, only being promo singles. During an interview, Redman stated that Reggie Noble (Redman's own birth name), does the album, not Redman. Redman also said that there is going to be more, "poppish", type songs, rather his normal "rugged" and "hardcore" songs.[10] After a few push backs, Redman Presents... Reggie was finally released on December 7, 2010. The first official single is "Def Jammable" & a video was released for the single. In a recent video interview by XXL Magazine Redman confirmed Blackout! 3 with Method Man and Muddy Waters 2 are coming in 2011.[11] It has been confirmed that Redman will appear on a remix along with French rapper Soprano of "Tranne Te" by Italian rapper Fabri Fibra.

Other ventures Film/Acting career In 2001, Redman co-starred with Method Man in the stoner comedy film How High, which featured the pair playing two marijuana-addled students attempting to survive at Harvard. Redman also stated at a recent concert (at the Soundset in Minneapolis) that he and Method Man are working on How High 2, a sequel to the first movie. Redman also played a major role in the horror film Seed of Chucky. He has been very selective of what movie roles he takes and wants to play starring roles with other notable actors. Method Man and Redman also appear in Def Jam Vendetta, Def Jam: Fight for NY and Def Jam: Icon video games, often as tag team partners, and briefly had their own television sitcom, Method & Red, on Fox during the 2003–2004 season. In the music video for The Offspring's single Original Prankster, Redman plays the part of the "concience", telling the "Original Prankster" what pranks to pull.

In 2004, Redman again co-starred with Method Man in the Nickelodeon cartoon, The Fairly OddParents in School's Out! The Musical, rapping the Pixes's song or Pixes Rap as it’s called. [12]

Redman is featured in the 2006 video game True Crime: New York City. He provides the voice of himself in a mini-game where he tries to escape New York during a riot. This character also has a cameo in the main storyline. In the UK, Redman was featured in an MTV Cribs special on MTV and TMF. The special was titled Dope Luxurious Cribs

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