Tagged with "entertainmnet"
How to Stay Healthy During Your Period Tags: health mental wellness period strong word life prodution new quality entertainmnet

It's important to focus on your health everyday, not just during your menstrual cycle. However, the abdominal pain, irritability, insomnia, fatigue and appetite changes women experience with their periods make staying healthy even more significant. Simple steps can improve your energy-levels, productivity and moods while menstruating.

Step 1

Exercise. The idea of stepping on the treadmill or posing on your Pilates mat may seem arduous during your period, particularly for women who experience fatigue due to hormonal fluctuations and lack of sleep. However, exercise actually helps increase your energy levels and improve your moods, as a heart-pumping routine promotes circulation and produces endorphins. Aim for at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity daily. A brisk walk, swim or bike ride are options to get you outdoors and active, which may help boost your spirits as well.

Step 2

Sit down with a soothing cup of ginger tea rather than coffee or alcohol, which can increase anxiety and make unsteady your already undulated emotions. Ginger tea, a decaffeinated beverage, is a widely used herbal remedy for menstrual cramping and nausea. In fact, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine reports that post-surgery and chemotherapy patients use ginger to alleviate nausea. Consult a health care professional for safety and dosage recommendations.

Step 3

Don't skimp on sleep. Generally, adults require slightly more than eight hours of sleep nightly, although a mere 35 percent actually get this amount regularly, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. If insomnia occurs during your period, due to the changes in hormone levels, take a hot bath at bedtime to relax your body. In addition, exposing yourself to late afternoon sunlight may help stimulate melatonin, which regulates the circadian rhythm, the body's internal clock.

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Step 4

Eat a balanced diet. Although many women crave chocolate and other treats during menstruation, giving in to the urge to binge will only leave you sluggish and guilt ridden. Instead, eat balanced meals and indulge in moderation. If you crave chocolate, allow yourself to eat a small serving rather than an entire box of truffles.

Step 5

Take an over-the-counter pain reliever for cramping, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, as directed by your doctor. This will help you stay active when stomach pains steal your motivation and sap your strength. The chemical prostaglandin causes the uterus to contract during menstruation, which doctor's believe results in stomach or back pain. More than half of all women experience these achy sensations, but they don't have to slow you down.

Source: Live Strong

Fab Box is the future of Entertainment Tags: fab box future entertainment word life production new quality entertainmnet
Fab Box is a musical project composed of two italian musicians: Massimo Bozzi and Fabrizio Ugolini.
 
Massimo worked like a tour musician with the italian artist "Lucio Dalla", "Biagio Antonacci", the band "Stadio" and also like producer , songwriter ,musician and arranger for the italian pop star MINA.
 
Fabrizio was a former member of the successful Italian cult hard rockers Revenge since 1982 to 1987, when the band split up and he joined Brando, a band from Milan whose line-up also included Fabrizio “V.zee” Grossi (now a reknown producer based on Los Angeles) with whom he toured internationally.
 
Through their connection to producer Fabrizio “V.zee” Grossi they became the chance to write songs for solo projects of Danny Vaughn (Tyketto) and Joseph Williams (Ex-Toto).
 
Based on the success of their works written for other artists and the great chemistry between them, the duo decided to record their albums. "Music From The Fab Box - Avenue of Allies 2009" and "2 - Art Media Music - 2015/16" are the impressive showcase, featuring songs in the best tradition of classic Westcoast AOR and Melodic Rock with a healthy dose of Pop.
Ultimate Rock Classic - Mick Jagger Tags: ultimate classic rock mick jagger word life production new quality entertainmnet

As the lead singer of the Rolling Stones, Mick Jagger has become a rock legend for his gritty, blues-influenced songs and for his charismatic stage presence.the music world, propelling the band and himself to a status unknown by most performers.

Early Musical Influences

Singer, songwriter, actor and producer Michael Phillip Jagger was born on July 26, 1943, in Dartford, England. As the lead singer of the Rolling Stones, Mick Jagger has become a rock legend for his gritty, blues-influenced songs and for his charismatic stage presence. He has been delighting fans for more than four decades.

The oldest son of a teacher and a homemaker, Jagger was a good student and popular among his classmates. He developed an interest in American blues and R&B music at an early age and got his first guitar at 14. As a teenager, Jagger started collecting blues records from the likes of Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf. He and his friend Dick Taylor soon started a band together called Little Boy Blue and the Blue Boys with Jagger as its singer.

In 1960, Jagger was accepted to the London School of Economics. He lived at home and commuted into the city to attend classes. Also working on his band, Jagger soon added a new member, guitarist Keith Richards. The two had known each other growing up in Dartford. Exploring London's emerging blues scene together, Jagger and Richards spent some time at the Ealing Club. There they saw Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated play and were wowed by guitarist Brian Jones who made guest appearances with the group. After a while, Jagger also appeared as a guest vocalist with Blues Incorporated as well.

Forming the Rolling Stones

Jagger, Richards, and Taylor soon joined up with Jones who wanted to start his own group. Pianist Ian Stewart was also an early member of what would become the Rolling Stones. By 1963, Charlie Watts joined as its drummer and Taylor departed. Stewart, however, stayed on to serve as the band's road manager, as well as to play and record with them. Taylor was replaced by Bill Wyman. Under the direction of their manager Andrew Loog Oldham, the Rolling Stones were marketed as a group of wild and rough rockers. The group's wild style helped land them a deal with Decca Records. Jagger was a key ingredient in the band's growing success, attracting audiences with his stage antics and his sex appeal.

At first, the band mostly recorded cover versions of other people's songs, but Richards and Jagger soon emerged as a powerful songwriting duo-occasionally using the pseudonym "Nanker Phelge" for some of their early work. The Rolling Stones first made the British charts in 1964 with a cover version of Bobby Womack's "It's All Over Now." That same year, the band toured the United States and had their first American hit with "That Girl Belongs to Yesterday." More hits soon followed, including the chart-topping "Satisfaction" and "Paint It Black."

Tragedy Strikes

In 1967, Jagger's personal life made headlines. He and his girlfriend, singer Marianne Faithfull, were among those arrested during a police raid of Keith Richards's country home in England. During their search, police officers found drug paraphernalia and illegal substances. Both Jagger and Richards were tried and convicted for drug-related offenses, but their sentences were dropped on appeal. Two years later, Jagger and Faithfull were arrested for drug possession after authorities raided Jagger's London home.

By the end of the decade, Jagger and the rest of the band were enjoying huge success. Beggars Banquet was released in 1968 and featured a straightforward rock style. One of its singles, "Jumpin' Jack Flash," hit the No. 1 spot on the U.K. charts.

In 1969, the Rolling Stones went through several big changes. Brian Jones left the group that June after his many drug arrests prevented him from leaving the country for the group's U.S. tour. He was replaced by 20-year-old guitarist Mick Taylor. Jones was found drowned in his pool less than a month later. The coronor's report found that Jones was under the influence of drugs and alcohol at the time of his death, and ruled his passing as "death by misadventure." In response to Jones' untimely demise, The Rolling Stones performed a free concert in Hyde Park on July 5, 1969, two days after Jones' death. Originally scheduled as an opportunity to present their new guitarist, the group dedicated the concert to Jones.

Before the concert began, Jagger read excepts from Percy Shelley's "Adonais," a poem about the death of a friend. Stagehands released hundreds of white butterflies as part of the tribute, and The Stones played one of Jones' favorite songs: "I'm Yours And I'm Hers."

Tragedy struck again several months later when the band launched their highly anticipated Let It Bleed (1969) album. To promote the record, the Stones organized a free concert at Altamont Speedway in northern California for that December. While the band was playing "Under My Thumb," a young man in the audience was stabbed and killed by a member of the Hell's Angels motorcycle gang. The tragic event was captured on film, and featured in the documentary Gimme Shelter.

Branching Out

Outside of the band, Jagger was branching out in acting. He played the title character, a legendary outlaw, in the film Ned Kelly (1970). In Performance (1970), Jagger played a reclusive rock star. Neither film made much of an impression on movie audiences.

While film success escaped him, Jagger remained a popular rock star. The Rolling Stones had several hit albums in the 1970sSticky Fingers (1971), Exile on Main Street (1972), and Some Girls (1978). By the mid-1980s, relationship between Jagger and Richards had become increasingly strained. Jagger focused much of his energy on a solo career with mixed results. While his first effort, 1985's She's the Boss, sold well enough to go platinum, his second album Primitive Cool (1987) failed to interest music buyers.

In 1989, the Rolling Stones were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Jagger and Richards decided to work together again around this time, resulting in Steel Wheels (1989), which reached the No. 3 spot on the U.S. album charts. To promote the record, The Rolling Stones toured extensively.

Jagger tried his hand at another solo record, 1993's Wandering Spirit, which was met with lukewarm enthusiasm. The following year, he fared much better with The Rolling Stones's latest effort Voodoo Lounge (1994). The record received strong marks from critics, winning a Grammy Award for Best Rock Album.

In between recording Bridges to Babylon (1997) and A Bigger Bang (2005) with The Rolling Stones, Jagger again aspired to establish himself as a solo artist with 2001's Goddess in the Doorway. He also developed a career for himself as a film producer, working on such projects as The Women (2008) and the forthcoming animated work Ruby Tuesday. Once viewed as a rebellious rocker, Jagger was the picture of decorum when he received a knighthood from Elizabeth II in 2003.

Personal Life

Jagger is a father of seven children. He has a daughter named Karis Hunt Jagger, born November 4, 1970 with actress Marsha Hunt. Around this time, Jagger became involved with Bianca Perez Moreno de Macias. The couple was married from 1971 to 1980 and welcomed a daughter named Jade Sheena Jezebel on October 21, 1971.

In 1990, Jagger wed longtime girlfriend model Jerry Hall. They had four children together: sons James Leroy Augustin (born August 28, 1985) and Gabriel Luke Beauregard (born December 13, 1997) and daughters Elizabeth Scarlett (born March 2, 1984) and Georgia May Ayeesha (born January 12, 1992). Their relationship ended in 1999 after Hall discovered that Jagger had an affair with model Luciana Gimenez Morad. After an initial dispute about paternity, Jagger was established to be the father of Morad's son, Lucas Maurice Morad, who was born on May 18, 1999.

Most recently, Jagger was romantically linked to designer L'Wren Scott, who launched a fashion brand in 2006. In March 2014, it was reported that Scott had been found dead at the age of 49, from an apparent suicide. According to reports, Scott hanged herself. At the time of her death, Jagger was on tour in Australia with his bandmates.

Source: Biography.com

Queen of Soul - Mary J. Blige
Category: The Art of Soul
Tags: mary j blige queen soul word life production new quality entertainmnet featured blog

I know who I am and what I can do. With each album, it’s just me continuing to grow.”

Pure, unadulterated and empowering. That has been Mary J. Blige’s calling card ever since her 1992 multi-platinum debut album, What’s the 411? And in the ensuing years, the singer/songwriter’s musical strong suit has attracted an intensely loyal fan base—responsible for propelling worldwide sales of more than 50 million albums.

With a track record of eight multi-platinum albums, nine Grammy Awards (plus a staggering 29 nominations) and four American Music Awards, Blige is only getting started. The singer returns just as fierce and compelling on her 10th studio album, the aptly titled “My Life II … The Journey Continues (Act 1).” Released via Blige’s Geffen/Interscope-distributed Matriarch label, the new project doubles as the sequel to Blige’s 1994 classic My Life.

“The original My Life started a movement,” reflects Blige. “And every album since then, from Share My World and No More Drama to The Breakthrough and Stronger With Each Tear, has marked a point of growth and evolution for me and my fans. What’s consistent is the fact that we all remain challenged in life to get to that next level. That’s one of the reasons for this sequel. And given the climate right now—the recession, war and other issues—I remembered there was so much healing with the first My Life. So that was another perspective behind my recording the album.”

Blige once again fashions a moving testimony about love, devotion and inner strength. Providing the album’s cornerstone is the track “Living Proof.” Also the closing song for the hit movie “The Help,” the spare yet powerful “Living Proof” speaks volumes about life’s hard-won rewards. It also resonates with Blige’s own growth as a woman and a singer/songwriter whose innate connection with her fans is unshakable. Bearing witness is the song’s second verse: “So glad the worst is over \ Cuz it almost took me out \ I can start living now \ I feel like I can do anything \ Finally I’m not afraid to breathe.”

“My fans and I are living examples that you can turn a negative situation into something positive,” declares Blige. “Conceptually, people have heard me like this. But artistically, with just a guitar, I don’t think they’ve ever heard me like that before.”

And Blige’s artistic growth doesn’t stop there. She goes toe to toe with Drake on her current uptempo chart-climber “Mr. Wrong,” then displays equal doses of fervor and naked honesty, respectively, on “25/8” (sampling the late Heavy D gem “Now That We Found Love”) and “No Condition.” She taps her rap alter ego Brook Lynn for the romance-sparked “Midnight Drive.” And as she did in 1993 with the 1975 Rufus featuring Chaka Khan hit “Sweet Thing,” Blige stamps new meaning onto a dance-floor revamp of the group’s 1983 classic “Ain’t Nobody.” Rounding out Blige’s life sequel are guest turns from Nas, Busta Rhymes, Rick Ross and a first-time pairing with Beyoncé on the diva-licious “Love a Woman.”

“A lot of women are misunderstood and a lot of men think they know what to do. But they don’t,” says Blige with a laugh. “This overall topic is very important right now.”

To help map our her Life journey, Blige collaborated with such intuitive producers as Jim Jonsin, Rico Love, Jerry “Wonda” Duplessis, Danja, Rodney “Darkchild” Jerkins, Sean Garrett, Tricky Stewart and the Underdogs. “Whoever has the right track that grabs my spirit, moves me and goes with the topics I’m coming up with … those are the producers I go for,” says Blige about her creative process.

Born in the Bronx, New York, Blige began moving people with her soulful voice when at 18 she signed with Andre Harrell’s Uptown Records in 1989, becoming the MCA-distributed label’s youngest and first female artist. Influenced at an early age by the music of Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan and Gladys Knight, Blige brought her own gritty, urban-rooted style—fusing hip-hop, soul and honest, frank lyrics—to the forefront on her 1992 debut album What’s the 411? The multi-platinum set, executive produced by Sean “Diddy” Combs, quickly spun off several hits, including two No. R&B No. 1s: “You Remind Me” and “Real Love.”

Earning the nickname the “Queen of Hip-Hop Soul,” Blige began forging a unique niche for herself on the more personal second album, 1994’s My Life. Co-writing a major portion of the album this time around, Blige reaped such hits and signature songs as “Be Happy” and a cover of Rose Royce’s 1976 hit “I’m Goin’ Down.” At the time she was dealing with several serious issues in her life, including drug addiction, alcoholism and an abusive relationship.

Notes Blige, “When I went first went into the studio to work on My Life II, it occurred to me how strong I’ve become since then. And that what has made me strong is not just the joy and great things happening in my life but the trials and difficulties that cause you to want to move out of that uncomfortable place to get to the next stage. With the first My Life album, I didn’t have that understanding. I just did not know why I was suffering so bad, why I was hurting.”

And thus began the Blige movement: connecting legions of fans who identify with and have accompanied her throughout her personal travails and growth—all fearlessly related through her music. Each subsequent album reads like a chapter from an autobiography: Share My World (1997), Mary (1999), No More Drama (2001), Love & Life (2003), the multiple Grammy-winning and hit-spewing The Breakthrough (2005), Growing Pains (2007) and Stronger with Each Tear (2009). Along the way, she’s lined up a string of hit singles, including “Not Gon’ Cry,” “Love Is All We Need,” Seven Days,” “All That I Can Say,” “Family Affair” and “Just Fine.”

Music isn’t the only thing keeping Blige busy. She is the co-founder of the Foundation for the Advancement of Women Now (FFAWN), whose mission is to empower women from all walks of life to reach their full individual potential. Flexing her talents as an entrepreneur, Blige launched her Melody line of sunglasses in 2009. In 2010, her “My Life” perfume became the first to sell more than 60,000 bottles in one day on the Home Shopping Network—with $1 from each purchase donated to FFAWN. A second perfume, “My Life Blossom,” was introduced in summer 2011.

Blige, who co-penned “I Can See in Color” for 2009’s “Precious” soundtrack, is also ramping up her acting career. She’ll appear next June in the Adam Shankman-directed “Rock of Ages,” the theatrical version of the Tony-nominated Broadway musical with stars Tom Cruise, Alec Baldwin and Catherine Zeta Jones.

As she continues her multi-faceted journey, however, one constant remains for Blige: her fans. “Being connected with their lives is what keeps me going,” she says. “They’re the reason why I am where I am: confident in knowing who I am and what I can do. With each album, it’s just me continuing to grow. And that’s the takeaway I want for my fans with My Life II … to please look at what we’ve survived and how strong we are now.”

Source: Official Website

Ronaldinho - Skillful by Nature Tags: ronaldinho skillful football soccer player word life production new quality entertainmnet sports featured blog

Soccer superstar Ronaldinho was a member of Brazil's 2002 World Cup championship team and twice won the FIFA World Player of the Year award.

Synopsis

Born on March 21, 1980, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Ronaldinho came from a family of soccer players to reach the pinnacle of success in the sport. After a celebrated youth career, Ronaldinho became a key member of the Brazilian team that won the 2002 World Cup. He has played for clubs in Brazil, France, Spain and Italy, and twice been named FIFA World Player of the Year.

Early Life

Ronaldinho was born Ronaldo de Assis Moreira on March 21, 1980, in Porto Alegre, Brazil. His father, João Moreira, was a former professional soccer player who also worked as a welder in a shipyard, and his mother, Miguelina de Assis, was a cosmetics saleswoman who later became a nurse. Ronaldinho's older brother, Roberto Assis, was also a professional soccer player; Ronaldinho was surrounded by soccer from the day he was born. "I come from a family where soccer has always been very present," he says. "My uncles, my father and my brother were all players. Living with that kind of background, I learned a great deal from them. I tried to devote myself to it more and more with the passage of time."

In particular, Ronaldinho idolized his father. "He was one of the most important people for me and in my career, even though he died when I was very young," he says. (João Moreira suffered a fatal heart attack when Ronaldinho was 8 years old.) "He gave me some of the best advice I've ever had. Off the field: 'Do the right thing and be an honest, straight-up guy.' And on the field: 'Play soccer as simply as possible.' He always said one of the most complicated things you can do is to play it simple."

Ronaldinho began playing organized youth soccer at the age of 7, and it was as a youth soccer player that he first received the nickname "Ronaldinho," the diminutive form of his birth name, Ronaldo. "They always called me that when I was little because I was really small," the player explains, "and I played with players who were older than me. When I got to the senior national team there was another Ronaldo, so they started calling me Ronaldinho because I was younger."

Growing up in a relatively poor, hardscrabble neighborhood, Ronaldinho's youth teams had to make do with makeshift playing fields. "The only grass on the field was in the corner," Ronaldinho remembers. "There was no grass in the middle! It was just sand." In addition to soccer, Ronaldinho also played futsal—an offshoot of soccer played indoors on a hard court surface and with only five players on each side. Ronaldinho's early experiences with futsal helped shape his unique playing style, marked by his remarkable touch and close control on the ball. "A lot of the moves I make originate from futsal," Ronaldinho once said, explaining, "It's played in a very small space, and the ball control is different in futsal. And to this day, my ball control is pretty similar to a futsal player's control."

Ronaldinho quickly developed into one of Brazil's most talented youth soccer players. When he was 13 years old, he once scored a ridiculous 23 goals in a single game. While leading his team to a variety of junior championships, Ronaldinho immersed himself in Brazil's long and glorious soccer history, studying past greats such as Pelé, Rivelino and Ronaldo, and dreaming of following in their footsteps. Then, in 1997, a teenaged Ronaldinho won a call-up to Brazil's Under-17 national team. The squad won the FIFA Under-17 World Championship in Egypt, and Ronaldinho was selected as the tournament's best player. Soon afterward, Ronaldinho signed his first professional contract to play for Grêmio, one of the most celebrated teams in the Brazilian league.

Professional Career

Ronaldinho made his senior debut for Grêmio in the 1998 Copa Libertadores tournament. The next year, he was invited to join the senior Brazilian national team to compete in the Confederations Cup in Mexico. Brazil turned in a second-place finish, and Ronaldinho won the Golden Ball Award as the tournament's best player as well as the Golden Boot Award as its leading goal scorer.

Firmly established as a star on the international stage, in 2001 Ronaldinho left Brazil for Europe, signing a contract to play for Paris Saint-Germain in France. A year later, he participated in his first World Cup on a loaded Brazilian squad that also featured Ronaldo and Rivaldo. Ronaldinho scored two goals in five matches, including the game-winner in a quarter-final victory over England, and Brazil went on to defeat Germany in the finals to claim its fifth World Cup title.

In 2003, Ronaldinho fulfilled a lifelong dream by joining FC Barcelona of the Spanish league, one of the world's most storied clubs, and winning the legendary No. 10 jersey typically worn by the squad's greatest creative player. In 2004 and 2005, Ronaldinho won back-to-back FIFA World Player of the Year awards, the sport's highest individual honor. He also led his teammates to the pinnacle of club success in 2006 with a triumphant run through the prestigious Champions League tournament. The following month, Ronaldinho headlined a very talented Brazilian squad that entered the World Cup with sky-high expectations. The tournament ended in disappointment for the defending champs, though, as France knocked Brazil out with a stunning upset in the quarter-finals.

In 2008, Ronaldinho left Barcelona to join another of the world's most renowned clubs, A.C. Milan, but his performance for the Italian Series A giant was mostly nondescript. Underscoring his fading status, the former World Player of the Year was not included in the 2010 Brazilian team that competed in the World Cup in South Africa.

In 2011, Ronaldinho returned to Brazil to play for Flamengo in Rio de Janeiro. The relationship between the club and its most prominent player got off to a great start when Flamengo won the 2011 Campeonato Carioca, but things turned sour by the following season. Ronaldinho missed several practices and performed indifferently in games, and eventually had his contract terminated due to unpaid wages. Ronaldinho signed with Atlético Mineiro in June 2012, a move that reignited his dynamic playmaking abilities, and he was given another shot with the national team to make the 2014 World Cup roster.

Personal Life and Legacy

In 2005, Ronaldinho and Brazilian dancer Janaína Mendes had a son, named João, after Ronaldinho's late father. The Brazilian superstar remains close to his family, with brother Roberto serving as his agent and sister Deisy acting as his press coordinator.

An absolute wizard with a soccer ball, Ronaldinho is considered by many to be the greatest player of his generation and one of the best in history. He says that his soccer career has been an emotional roller coaster filled with high highs, low lows and a lifetime of unforgettable moments. "For me soccer provides so many emotions, a different feeling every day," Ronaldinho says. "I've had the good fortune to take part in major competitions like the Olympics, and winning the World Cup was also unforgettable. We lost in the Olympics and won in the World Cup, and I'll never forget either feeling."

Source: Biography.com

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