Tagged with "jack"
First African American Baseball Player - Jackie Robinson Tags: african america baseball player jackie robinson word life production new quality entertainment featured blog

Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born in Cairo, Georgia in 1919 to a family of sharecroppers. His mother, Mallie Robinson, single-handedly raised Jackie and her four other children. They were the only black family on their block, and the prejudice they encountered only strengthened their bond. From this humble beginning would grow the first baseball player to break Major League Baseball's color barrier that segregated the sport for more than 50 years.

Jackie at UCLAGrowing up in a large, single-parent family, Jackie excelled early at all sports and learned to make his own way in life. At UCLA, Jackie became the first athlete to win varsity letters in four sports: baseball, basketball, football and track. In 1941, he was named to the All-American football team. Due to financial difficulties, he was forced to leave college, and eventually decided to enlist in the U.S. Army. After two years in the army, he had progressed to second lieutenant. Jackie's army career was cut short when he was court-martialed in relation to his objections with incidents of racial discrimination. In the end, Jackie left the Army with an honorable discharge.

In 1945, Jackie played one season in the Negro Baseball League, traveling all over the Midwest with the Kansas City Monarchs. But greater challenges and achievements were in store for him. In 1947, Brooklyn Dodgers president Branch Rickey approached Jackie about joining the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Major Leagues had not had an African-American player since 1889, when baseball became segregated. When Jackie first donned a Brooklyn Dodger uniform, he pioneered the integration of professional athletics in America. By breaking the color barrier in baseball, the nation's preeminent sport, he courageously challenged the deeply rooted custom of racial segregation in both the North and the South.

Jackie sliding into home plateAt the end of Robinson's rookie season with the Brooklyn Dodgers, he had become National League Rookie of the Year with 12 homers, a league-leading 29 steals, and a .297 average. In 1949, he was selected as the NL's Most Valuable player of the Year and also won the batting title with a .342 average that same year. As a result of his great success, Jackie was eventually inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962.

 

Jackie married Rachel Isum, a nursing student he met at UCLA, in 1946. As an African-American baseball player, Jackie was on display for the whole country to judge. Rachel and their three children, Jackie Jr., Sharon and David, provided Jackie with the emotional support and sense of purpose essential for bearing the pressure during the early years of baseball.

Jackie Robinson stampJackie Robinson's life and legacy will be remembered as one of the most important in American history. In 1997, the world celebrated the 50th Anniversary of Jackie's breaking Major League Baseball's color barrier. In doing so, we honored the man who stood defiantly against those who would work against racial equality and acknowledged the profound influence of one man's life on the American culture. On the date of Robinson's historic debut, all Major League teams across the nation celebrated this milestone. Also that year, The United States Post Office honored Robinson by making him the subject of a commemorative postage stamp. On Tuesday, April 15 President Bill Clinton paid tribute to Jackie at Shea Stadium in New York in a special ceremony.

Will Paula, Simon, and Randy Reunite?
Category: Celebrity Pick
Tags: paul abdula randy jackson simon cowell word life production new quality entertainment celebrity pick

With reports saying the newest season of "American Idol" (AI) is not doing anyone a favor, rumors of the return of the original AI judges Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul and Randy Jackson on the idol judges' seats had been suiting for most of the idol fans committed to watching the show since it first aired in 2001.

After 13 years of airing on television, now is the time that Al series is hitting its lowest rating. "Survivor" on the CBS Network is now ahead of "American Idol" 2014 by 6 percent in the competition for the 8:00-9:00 p.m. timeslot, according to the March 27 report of TV Media Insights.

"American Idol" producers had been ganging up with new show formats. Season13 had only been one proof that the show had undergone many changes in the past couple of years and gearing up for more.

One of the distinct changes on the popular reality show had been the judge changes. From the originals Cowell, Abdul and Jackson to having Kara DioGuardi, "Oscars" host Ellen DeGeneres, Steven Tyler, Mariah Carey, Nicki Minaj and now to its current judges Jennifer Lopez, Keith Urban and Harry Connick Jr, "American Idol" appeared only constant at one and that was to its host Ryan Seacrest who had been present since the beginning of the show.

Rumors of changing the judges only intensified when Simon Cowell posted an intriguing statement on his Twitter account regarding the original American Idol judges "reunion."

The tweet had gained public reactions, garnering 2,448 retweets as of the moment and 6,902 favorites. Brandon Moore, an apparent fan of the original judges had replied to Cowell saying he would love to see the original judges' combination again.

Danielle Saco, another fan, admitted Cowell's revelation made her heart cry, and even pleaded that the reunion should happen sooner.

Reports from February 2014 confirmed Fox already made its final decision to cancel the X Factor USA for 2014, where Cowell was one of the judges. This bit of news first reported by Mail Online had made it the more forthcoming for all the hopeful fans wanting to reunite the original American Idol judges.

A new revelation from Bob Mezan, reporting for Reuters, however, shared Simon Cowell is opening a new "X-Factor" musical. This can shatter the hopes of all "American Idol" fans rooting for the original judges. But apparently, returning on the reality show, Cowell had already owed up to the fans a "reunion" in the future.

Source: International Business Time

Cactus Jack, Mankind, Mick Foley is one of the greatest wrestlers of all time Tags: cactus jack mick foley mankind greatest wrestlers all time word life production new quality

Mick Foley is a legendary professional wrestler, turned multi-time best-selling author, turned stand-up comic/spoken word performer.

One of the cornerstones of WWE’s meteoric rise in the late 90’s, Mick Foley earned the nickname ‘The Hardcore Legend’ for his ability to absorb seemingly inhuman punishment in some of the most dramatic matches in sports-entertainment history. Already a respected veteran for his 11 physically punishing years wrestling under the name Cactus Jack, Foley’s career soared to new heights in WWE as ‘Mankind’, a character Foley claimed was inspired by a combination of reading ‘Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein’ and listening tothe music of Tori Amos.

As Cactus Jack, Foley won the 1995 ‘King of the Deathmatch’ tournament in Yokohama, Japan, and continued wrestling, despite the amputation of his right ear, in a match against Vader in Munich, Germany in 1994. As Mankind, Foley was a 3-time WWE Champion, but is best known for his epic and brutal battle with The Undertaker in 1998’s ‘Hell in a Cell’ match, during which he was knocked unconscious after falls both off of and through the 16 foot Cell structure. Despite the injury, Foley finished the match – with one of his front teeth lodged in his nose.

With retirement looming as a result of that physically demanding style, Foley penned his own memoir, ‘Have a Nice Day’ without the aid of a ghost-writer – writing 200,000 words in longhand in 50 days. The book showcased Foley’s paradoxical blend of wit and wisdom, wildness and warmth, and shocked the literary world by hitting number one on The New York Times best-seller list in October, 1999. The book remained on the Times list for twenty six weeks. A follow-up, 2001’s ‘Foley is Good’ hit number one on The New York Times list as well. Foley has published a total of ten books; four memoirs, four children’s books and two novels.

After speaking at some of the United Stated most respected colleges and universities – including MIT, Syracuse University, Notre Dame and The University of Miami, Foley decided to take his verbal skills to the stand-up comedy stage in 2009. 2012 saw Foley earn rave reviews for his comedy sets at ‘Just for Laughs’ in Montreal, and the ‘Edinburgh (UK) Fringe Fest’ – the two largest comedy festivals in the world. He is currently represented by Innovative Artists.

Foley’s acting credentials include ’30 Rock’, ‘Warren the Ape’, Now and Again’, ‘G vs E’ and ‘Boy Meets World’ and he was featured in the critically acclaimed documentary ‘Beyond the Mat’ He has done voice work on ‘Squidbillies’ ‘Celebrity Death Match’ and ‘Avatar: the Last Airbender’ and was featured in a 2012 episode of ‘Celebrity Wife Swap’. His list of guest appearances include ‘The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, ‘The Late Show with Jay Leno’, ‘Late Night with Conan O’Brien’, ‘Who Wants to be a Millionaire’, ‘Good Morning America’, ‘Family Feud’ ‘Redeye’, ‘Larry King Live’ and several appearances on ‘Today’. He was featured in a 2010 story on ‘ABC’s World News Tonight’ for his work as an online volunteer with RAINN, the nation’s largest anti-sexual assault organization. Foley was also recognized for his work with RAINN at 2010’s ‘Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear’ – where he was awarded a Medal of Reasonableness’ from Jon Stewart.

Foley lives with his wife and four children on Long Island. His latest book, ‘A Most Mizerable Christmas’ will be published in October, 2012 by DK Books. The Foley’s have sponsored children with Child-Fund International for twenty years.

Source: Official Website

The Reality behind the crack Era-New Jack City Tags: new jack city reality crack ere nino brown ice t word life production classic

New Jack City is a 1991 American crime film directed by Mario Van Peebles in his directorial debut, who also co-stars in the film. The film stars Wesley Snipes, Ice T, Allen Payne, Chris Rock and Judd Nelson. The film was released in the United States on March 8, 1991.

Wesley Snipes played Nino Brown, a rising drug dealer and crime lord in New York City during the crack epidemic. Ice T played Scotty Appleton, a detective who vows to stop Nino's criminal activity by going undercover to work for Nino's gang.

The film is based on the crack cocaine war in the USA. It was the first theatrically released film for director and co-star Mario Van Peebles. The film was based upon an original story and screenplay written by Thomas Lee Wright who had previously penned a draft of The Godfather Part III and would go on to write, direct and produce a seminal documentary of American gang life, Eight Tray Gangster: The Making of a Crip.

The screenplay was co-written by journalist turned screenwriter Barry Michael Cooper, who also scripted 1994's Above the Rim, and Sugar Hill, which also starred Snipes. Cooper is the first African American screenwriter in history to have two films produced in one year:[citation needed] Sugar Hill was released on February 25, 1994 by Beacon-20th Century Fox Pictures, and Above The Rim was released on March 23, 1994 by New Line Cinema.

Barry Michael Cooper's rewrite was based on a December 1987 The Village Voice cover story written by Cooper titled "Kids Killing Kids: New Jack City Eats Its Young".The story revolved around the 20th anniversary of the 1967 riots in Detroit, and in its wake, Nicky Barnes, rise of crack cocaine gangs in the late 1980s, such as Young Boys Inc., and the Chambers Brothers.

Nino Brown (Wesley Snipes) and his gang, the Cash Money Brothers, become the dominant drug ring in New York City, once crack cocaine is introduced to the streets, during the late 1980s. Undercover detective Scotty Appleton (Ice T) strikes a deal with stick-up kid, Pookie (Chris Rock). The deal takes a wrong turn when Pookie takes the money and runs off, causing Scotty to have a long chase. He wounds Pookie with his gun and attempts to arrest him, but the police let him go.

Meanwhile, Nino plots a plan to turn an entire apartment complex (real life Graham Court, known in the film as the "Carter") into a crack house, with the assistance of his best friend/right-hand, Gee Money (Allen Payne), enforcer, Duh Duh Duh Man (Bill Nunn), gangstress Keisha (Vanessa A. Williams), Nino's girlfriend, Selina (Michael Michele), and her tech-savy cousin, Kareem Akbar (Christopher Williams). Gee Money and Keisha take out Rastafarian rival, Fat Smitty, while Nino forces the Carter's landlord out into the streets, naked.

After Det. Stone (Mario Van Peebles)--leader of the team tasked with taking down the CMB--is put under pressure by the Police Commissioner, Scotty volunteers to go undercover and infiltrate Nino's gang. He is partnered with loose-cannon, Nick Peretti (Judd Nelson), as they try to convict the gang with evidence of drug trafficking. Elsewhere, Frankie Needles (Anthony DeSando) pays Nino a visit to deliver him a message from mob boss Don Armeteo (John Aprea), who taxes the CMB. Nino scornfully calls for Needles to rely a message back to the Don that he's cutting off taxing him, and that CMB is an independent operation.

While he and Nick are spying on Nino and his crew as they hand out Thanksgiving turkeys to the poor, Scotty spots Pookie, now a crack fiend. He tracks him down just as Pookie was in the middle of beating his junkie girlfriend over the turkey he brought back. Instead of arresting him, Scotty puts Pookie in rehab for his drug addiction. After completing treatment, Pookie wants to return the favor and help Scotty bring down Nino. Against his better judgment, as well the strong disapproval of Stone and Peretti, Scotty recruits Pookie to work undercover at the Carter, gathering incriminating evidence against Nino and the Cash Money Brothers.

However, Pookie ends up relapsing and sneaking drugs. While high, Pookie is caught by Gee Money, who also realizes that he is wired. When the cops realize their cover has been blown, the CMB abandon and burn the Carter complex, including any evidence of their activities with the crack addicted civilians inside. Later, the cops try to reach Pookie, but they find his bloody corpse attached with explosives. Nick defuses the explosives mere seconds before they explode. Meanwhile, when Nino discovers that Gee Money ordered the Carter to be destroyed, he vehemently threatens him to never make a costly mistake again.

After Pookie's funeral, Scotty and Nick take matters into their own hands by going undercover as a drug dealers wanting to do business with Gee Money. Scotty infiltrates the CMB--thanks in part to the ambitions (and increasing drug use) of Gee Money--after they bribe Frankie Needles. Nino doesn't trust Gee Money's new clientele, but agrees to do business with Scotty, warning Gee that if Scotty isn't who he claims, he'll kill the both of them. On their first encounter, Nino tells Scotty a story of how he murdered a school teacher as a part of his initiation into a gang called the L.A. Boyz, as a youth. When questioned by Scotty if the murder was personal or business, Nino explains this away by saying: "My brother, it's always business. Never personal." Scotty further gains the trust of Nino after "saving" him from a gun-toting old man (Bill Cobbs)--who earlier, tried to convince the police of Nino's destruction of the community--and by revealing information about Gee Money's side deal.

While Nino, Scotty and the CMB attend a wedding, Nick sneaks into Nino's mansion to collect the video tapes from the Carter drug operations, in order to gather evidence of Pookie's death and the drugs. After the wedding, Don Armeteo sends hitman to assassinate Nino. A massive shootout erupts between the CMB and the hitters. After witnessing Nino use a little girl as a shield to protect himself, Scotty attempts to shoot Nino behind his back. Keisha is gunned down as she sprays a hail of bullets into the van the shooters escape in. Later, Selina condemns Nino for his murderous activities and Nino throws her out. Don Armeteo calls Nino to taunt him, explaining that he "needed to be spanked" for his arrogance. Nino threatens him before the Don hangs up. Later, he opens fire on Don Armeteo and his henchman from the back of a speeding motorcycle, killing them all.

Scotty and Nick meet with Stone to arrange a sting operation to nab Nino, once and for all. But at the sting, Scotty's cover is blown by Kareem, who just happened to be at the scene the day Scotty wounded Pookie. A shootout ensues; Nick saves Scotty by killing the Duh Duh Duh Man, before he could open fire on him. Nino manages to escape. That night, he confronts Gee Money for his act of betrayal. Gee accuses Nino of being egotistical, and putting himself over what they built together. Gee wants things to go back to the way they were, but Nino sees no going back, and regretfully kills him.

After the gang's collapse, Nino holes himself up in an apartment and continues his criminal empire, solo. Scotty and Nick infiltrate the complex, with Nick taking out Nino's guards and Scotty crashing into Nino's apartment. Nino is brutally beaten by Scotty, who reveals that the school teacher Nino killed was his mother. For his crimes against the community, as well as his mother's murder, Scotty attempts to kill Nino again, but Nick gets him to put down the gun. As a bloodied Nino is taken into custody, he warns Scotty that he'll be out in a week and that he's a dead man.

At his trial, Nino pleads guilty to a lesser charge and turns state's evidence, falsely claiming that he was forced to work for the CMB because they threatened to kill his mother and pointing the finger at Kareem as the actual leader of CMB. Because his punishment would include at least 12 months prison time, Nino gets only a year in prison, which leaves Scotty outraged. But as he's speaking with reporters outside of the courtroom, Nino is greeted by the old man (who tried to kill him earlier) who says "Idolator! Your soul is required in hell!"; the old man then shoots Nino in the chest. Scotty and Nick are both satisfied, as Nino falls over the balcony to his death. As onlookers look down at Nino's body, an epilogue states to the viewers that "Although this is a fictional story, there are Nino Browns in every major city in America. If we don't confront the problem realistically--without empty slogans and promises--then drugs will continue to destroy our country."

Source: Wikipedia

The youngest of the the Jacksons, Janet has led a very impressive musical life.
Category: The Golden Era
Tags: janet jackson musical caree word life production golden era feature blog

Janet Jackson is an American recording artist and actress. She is the youngest child of the Jackson family of musicians. She is best known for the hit singles "Nasty", "Rhythm Nation", "That's the Way Love Goes," "Together Again" and "All for You." Jackson is ranked as one of the best-selling artists in the history of contemporary music.

Jackson Childhood

Singer, songwriter and actress Janet Jackson was born May 16, 1966, in Gary, Indiana. The youngest of nine children born to Joseph Walter Jackson and his wife, Katherine, Jackson grew up in the affluence of a show business family.

Her five brothers—Jackie, Tito, Marlon, Jermaine and Michael—signed a contract with Motown Records in 1968 and would go on to rule the charts as The Jackson Five, with such hits as "I Want You Back," "Stop, the Love You Save," "ABC" and "Dancing Machine."

In late 1969, Jackson took her daughters Rebbie, LaToya and Janet, and her youngest son, Randy, to join her husband in Los Angeles, where they had moved to further the band's career. (Tito's twin brother, Brandon, had died within 24 hours of the twins' premature birth in 1957.)

The Jackson children were raised in the Jehovah's Witness faith, as Katherine Jackson had been baptized as a Jehovah's Witness in 1963. LaToya Jackson famously chronicled their tumultuous childhood—including charges of physical and sexual abuse by Joseph Jackson—in her tell-all autobiography, but Janet and others of her siblings disputed LaToya's account. The tensions within the family certainly increased on account of Michael Jackson's emergence as a solo artist and a superstar beginning in the early 1970s.

Janet Jackson first appeared on stage in April 1974, singing and doing impressions alongside her brother Randy in the Jackson family's Las Vegas act. In 1976, she appeared on The Jacksons, a summer replacement television show. Her performance earned her the attention of a producer who hired her to play Penny, a regular on the TV comedy series Good Times, from 1977-79. She continued her television work in the short-lived A New Kind of Family (1979-80), the sitcom Different Strokes (1981-2), and the teen drama Fame (1984-5), based at a New York City performing arts high school.

Topping the Pop Charts

Unlike many of her siblings, Janet Jackson attended public school in Encino, California, for some time before switching to Valley Professional School, from which she graduated in 1984. During her time on Fame, she was able to break away from her family's supervision while on location in New York. In September 1984, she eloped with James DeBarge, a musician in the group DeBarge, also on the Motown label. Jackson's family disapproved of DeBarge, and the marriage was brief, as she applied for an annulment in January 1985, which was granted the following November.

With the guidance of her brother Michael, she released her debut album Janet Jackson, in 1982. The album reached No.

84 on the pop charts and had three hit singles, including "Young Love" and "Give Your Love to Me." The self-titled album sold about 250,000 copies, as did her follow-up, Dream Street, which featured contributions from her brothers Michael, Tito, Jackie and Marlon.

 

Jackson scored her first major success in 1986 with Control, released on the A&M label. Control, produced with the writing-producing team of Jimmy Jam (James Harris III) and Terry Lewis, sold eight million copies worldwide and featured two No. 1 singles, "What Have You Done For Me Lately" and the title track. Nominated for three Grammy Awards and nine American Music Awards, it won two of the latter. Jackson"s new, sexier style, stage presence, and dancing ability were all showcased in her videos, and combined to make her a star.

Her next album, Janet Jackson's Rhythm Nation 1814, was a more socially conscious album, also produced by Jam and Lewis, who wrote nearly half the songs. The album spawned a number of hit singles, including "Black Cat" (written by Jackson herself), "Miss You Much," and "Escapade," and again sold around eight million copies. Rhythm Nation, which won three American Music Awards, made Jackson the first artist to have seven Top 5 hits from a single album. Jackson embarked on her first tour, in support of the album, in the spring of 1990.

On the Big Screen

Janet Jackson's contract with Virgin Records, signed in March 1991, was at the time the largest recording contract in history, at $32 million. (Michael Jackson reportedly held off signing his so-called "billion-dollar" contract until after Janet signed so as not to steal her publicity.)

In the summer of 1993, Jackson unveiled her fifth album, titled Janet as well as her first starring film role, in the drama Poetic Justice, directed by John Singleton, who had received two Oscar nominations for writing and directing his debut feature, Boyz N the Hood. The film received disappointing reviews, but Jackson received an Oscar nomination for "Again," which she performed on the soundtrack. Janet (another Jam and Lewis collaboration), sold more than six million copies, and featured "Any Time, Any Place," which became Jackson's 14th gold single, tying her with Aretha Franklin as the female solo singers with the most gold singles. In addition, "That's the Way Love Goes" earned a Grammy nomination for best rhythm and blues song. Jackson also produced a song with brother Michael entitled "Scream" in 1995. The music video cost $7 million to produce, making it the most expensive video ever made.

Continued Success and Controversy

Jackson's sixth album, The Velvet Rope (1997), brought her sexually suggestive style to a whole new level, generating some impressive buzz from critics but did not reach the sales records of her three previous blockbusters. On a more personal level, Jackson made headlines in when it was revealed that she had been secretly married to her manager and longtime boyfriend, Rene Elizondo, for eight years. Jackson announced their separation in 1999, but the fact of their marriage (which Jackson's sisters LaToya and Rebbie had earlier alleged to the press) became public when Elizondo filed for divorce in May of 2000.

Jackson continued her acting career with a role opposite Eddie Murphy in the blockbuster comedy The Nutty Professor II (summer 2000). A year later, she released another smash hit album, All For You, which like The Velvet Rope was more sexually explicit than her early albums. The success of All For You and her subsequent world tour, along with a reported $80 million recording deal with Virgin, put Janet Jackson squarely back on top of the pop world. As if to confirm her success, Jackson won an American Music Award for favorite female pop/rock artist in January 2002.

Jackson's star continued to rise until an incident at the Super Bowl halftime show in 2004 caused a slight falter. During a live performance with Justin Timberlake, Jackson's right breast was exposed during a "costume reveal." The "wardrobe malfunction" stunt caused an uproar among both fans and the Federal Communications Commission, and Jackson subsequently failed to appear at the Grammy Awards and dropped out of a television project in which she was to play Lena Horne at the elder actress's request.

Marriage to Wissam Al Mana

These days, however, Jackson's life seems to be on the upswing. She got engaged to Qatari billionaire Wissam Al Mana in December 2012. The couple will reportedly wed the following spring with a ceremony in Al Mana's native country, but never publicly announced that the marriage was official. News outlets began reporting in February 2013 that the couple had wed the previous year. According to a statement the couple made to Entertainment Tonight, their wedding was a "quiet, private and beautiful ceremony." Source: © 2013 A+E Networks. All rights reserved.

 

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