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Carl Lewis-Best known for his 65 consecutive victories Tags: carl lewis sports entertainment track star word life production new quality

Track and field athlete Carl Lewis was born on July 1, 1961, in Birmingham, Alabama. He qualified for the Olympics in 1980, but did not participate because of the U.S. boycott of the Moscow Games. He did go on to compete in four Olympic Games—1984 in Los Angeles, 1988 in Seoul, 1992 in Barcelona and 1996 in Atlanta. He won numerous gold and silver medals before his retirement in 1997.

Early Years

One of the most successful Olympic athletes of all time, Frederick Carlton Lewis was born July 1, 1961, in Birmingham, Alabama. Raised in Willingboro, New Jersey, Carl and his three siblings enjoyed a middle-class upbringing, one in which their parents, Bill and Evelyn Lewis, exposed them to a variety of arts and sports. With his mother, Lewis attended plays and musicals, and took classes in cello, piano and dance.

Lewis got his first taste of track and field events by competing for the local town club, which his parents both coached. While initially short for his age, Lewis underwent a traumatic growth spurt at the age of 15, shooting up two and a half inches in just a month, forcing him to get around on crutches until his body could adjust to the change.

By the time Lewis was a senior in high school, he was one of the premier track and field high school athletes in the country. His long-jump mark that year of 26-8 ended up setting a new national prep record.

Spurning the chance to stay local and attend Villanova University, Lewis enrolled at the University of Houston in 1980. There, Lewis continued to set track and field marks. In 1981, he was named the top U.S. amateur athlete after becoming just the second person in NCAA history to win the 100 meters and long jump at the college championships. The first person to achieve that accomplishment had been Lewis' idol, Jesse Owens.

Olympic Success

While Lewis qualified for the 1980 Summer Games in Moscow, he never got the chance to compete because of the U.S. boycott. Four years later, Lewis became the most dominant force at the Games in Los Angeles.

In the 100 meters, Lewis was transcendent, setting an Olympic record by besting the next closest runner by a record eight feet. He went on to win three additional golds in the long jump, the 200, and the 4x100 relay.

Lewis went on to compete in three more Games: the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, South Korea; the 1992 Games in Barcelona, Spain; and the 1996 Games in Atlanta. In all, Lewis won nine gold medals, including a final gold in 1996 in the long jump. That same year, Lewis regained the ranking of No. 1 in the event, an astonishing 15 years after first claiming the top spot.

In addition, Lewis won eight career gold medals in the World Championships. His athleticism was so spectacular that the Dallas Cowboys drafted Lewis, who'd never played a down of college football, in the 12th round of the 1984 NFL draft. Two months later, the Chicago Bulls selected the track and field star in the 10th round of the NBA draft.

Lewis' long competitive career came to an end on August 26, 1997, following his participation in the 4x100 relay at the Berlin Grand Prix.

Despite his Olympic glory, Lewis has experienced a complicated relationship with the press and public. Never lacking confidence, Lewis has been dubbed by many as just plain arrogant.

Already sponsored by Nike when he was a student at the University of Houston, Lewis unsuccessfully tried to bat back the perception at the 1984 Games that he cared more about his commercial appeal than about the Olympics themselves. As a result of that perception, the swath of endorsements he expected after his winning performances never came.

In addition, Lewis was quite vocal against fellow athletes who'd been caught, or were perceived to be, using steroids to gain a competitive advantage. His biggest target was Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson, who initially beat Lewis in the 100 at the Seoul games but was later stripped of his title after testing positive for a steroid.

But in 2003 Lewis had to admit that he himself had tested positive for banned substances during the 1988 U.S. Olympic trials. In acknowledging the revelations, however, Lewis was far from contrite.

"It's ridiculous," he said. "Who cares? I did 18 years of track and field and I've been retired for five years, and they're still talking about me, so I guess I still have it."

Awards and Honors

In 2001 Lewis was inducted into the USA Track & Field Hall of Fame. Around that same time, Sports Illustrated named the retired star its "Olympian of the Century," while the International Olympic Committee named him its "Sportsman of the Century."

© 2014 A+E Networks. All rights reserved.

Florence Griffith Joyner was known as one of the fastest competitive runners of the 1980s. Tags: florence griffith joyner olympic star word life production feature blogs

"[Florence Griffith Joyner] was someone who wanted to make a fashion statement, as well as do it while running so fast you could barely see the fashion," says Phil Hersh of the Chicago Tribune on ESPN Classic's SportsCentury series.

Florence Griffith Joyner

Florence Griffith Joyner still holds the world record in the 100- and 200-meters.

With her outrageous looks and lightning speed, Florence Griffith Joyner captivated the world. Her racing attire consisted of a variety of outfits -- some lace, some fluorescent, some bearing one leg. Her nails, sometimes longer than four inches, became a trademark.

In 1988, FloJo arrived in Korea for the Olympics as the favorite to win the 100- and 200-meter dashes. Just two months earlier at the U.S. Olympic Trials, she obliterated Evelyn Ashford's world record of 10.76 seconds in the 100 with her time of 10.49 and ran the four fastest 100s ever (though one was wind-aided). She also set an American record in winning the 200.

In the 100-meter final in Seoul, the 5-foot-7, 130-pound Joyner bettered the Olympic record with her 10.54, but because it was wind-aided it didn't go into the record book. On the way to the gold medal, she broke the Olympic mark three times in four races -- which gave her the seven fastest 100-meter times in history.

She blistered Marita Koch's world record of 21.71 seconds by running a 21.56 in the semifinals of the 200 meters. Then, less than two hours later, she bettered that mark with an amazing 21.34 in capturing her second gold medal.

But the drug scandal at the 1988 Olympics overshadowed her achievements. When the men's 100-meter winner, Ben Johnson, had his gold medal stripped because he tested positive for steroids, FloJo's races were looked on with skepticism.

Some suspected her of using performance-enhancing substances because of her incredible physique and stunning improvements in the past year. Brazilian middle-distance runner Joaquim Cruz accused FloJo of using performance-enhancing drugs. Magazines ran two photos side-by-side depicting her facial differences between 1984 and 1988.

Through it all, FloJo maintained that she never used drugs. Although she tested negative on all of her drug tests, the rumors kept swirling. And soon she left the sport she loved.

The seventh of 11 children, Florence Delorez Griffith was born on Dec. 21, 1959 in Mojave, Cal., 90 miles north of Los Angeles. When she was four, her mother Florence, a seamstress, left her father Robert, who was an electrical technician, and moved the family into the Jordan Downs housing project in the Watts section of Los Angeles.

As a child, Florence attempted many things. She sewed together her own clothes for her Barbie dolls and constantly tried on her mother's dresses. She had handstand competitions with her siblings and neighborhood kids. She rode to the store on a unicycle. She even trained a pet rat, and once was asked to leave a mall when she came with a pet snake around her neck.

Her speed was shown at an early age. The Griffith children spent some time with their father in the Mojave Desert and when Florence was five, he dared her to chase jackrabbits. Eventually, she caught one. She ran potato-sack racing in a park. By the time she was seven, she was running track.

At Jordan High School, she set school records in the sprints and long jump. After graduating in 1978, she helped California State Northridge win the national championship the following year. Her sprint coach was Bob Kersee.

After the title, she dropped out of school for financial reasons and worked as a bank teller. In 1980, she enrolled at UCLA, where Kersee had become an assistant coach.

Florence Griffith Joyner

Florence Griffith Joyner's world record of 10.49 in the 100 meters has stood since 1988.

As a junior in 1982, she won her first individual NCAA title, taking the 200 meters in 22.39 seconds. In 1983, although she slipped back to a second-place finish in the 200, she won the 400 in 50.94. After graduating UCLA that year with a degree in psychology, she finished fourth in the 200 at the World Championships.

At the 200 at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, she ran a 22.02 to take the silver medal, beaten by Valerie Brisco-Hooks, who set an Olympic record of 21.81.

After the 1985 track season, without financial means of support, she again went to work at a bank. At night, she often styled her friends' hair and nails. Depending on the style, she charged between $45 and $200 for braids that would last five months. Meanwhile, she still found time to train under Kersee, and at the 1987 World Championships she won the silver medal in the 200 with a time of 21.96.

On Oct. 10, 1987, Griffith became part of the first family of track and field when she married Al Joyner, the 1984 Olympic triple jump gold medalist and brother of heptathlon Olympian Jackie Joyner-Kersee.

The following July, FloJo exploded into national prominence at the 1988 Olympic Trials in Indianapolis. With her 10.49 seconds in the 100 meters, she crushed Ashford's four-year-old world record. Controversy came immediately when the wind reading of 0.0 appeared. Just 30 feet away on the triple-jump anemometer, winds swirled at an unacceptable 4.3 meters per second, and almost every sprint that day had a wind reading.

But Joyner's record was upheld. The next day, she won the final in 10.61 with a legal wind of 1.2 meters, leaving no doubt that she was the "fastest woman in the world."

A week after the Trials, Joyner left Kersee's training camp and hired a business manager. Her husband Al took over as her fulltime coach. Financial differences and a lack of attention were the reasons given for the switch.

On Sept. 25, 1988, FloJo won her first Olympic gold medal. She got a terrific start in the 100 meters and past the halfway point she was smiling. Finishing in her wind-aided 10.54 seconds, she easily defeated Ashford, the defending champion.

Four days later, she astounded the track world with her world-record performance in the 200, pulling away in the second half of the race to beat Grace Jackson by .38 seconds. FloJo capped her Olympics by winning a third gold in the 4x100-meter relay and a silver in the 4x400 relay.

 

But four months later, the word's fastest woman was gone from track and field.

In February 1989, the 29-year-old Joyner made the stunning announcement that she was retiring from competitive running to concentrate on business opportunities, such as acting and writing. Although she had invited anyone to test her every week if it would prove she didn't use drugs, some felt that she was fleeing the sport while she could.

The rumors, though, wouldn't cease. Later in 1989, sprinter Darrell Robinson told a German magazine, Stern, that FloJo paid him $2,000 for 10 cubic centimeters of human growth hormone the previous year. She denied the accusations vehemently. Appearing on The Today Show with him, she called Robinson "a compulsive, crazy, lying lunatic."

After her retirement, FloJo wrote children's books, poetry and a romance novel. She began an acting career, making guest appearances on the sitcom 227 and the soap opera Santa Barbara. She established her own clothing design and cosmetics businesses. She fulfilled a lifelong dream as a fashion designer, even designing uniforms for the Indiana Pacers in 1989. While she trained for long-distance running, she never made a serious comeback.

On Nov. 15, 1990, she gave birth to her only child, Mary Ruth Joyner.

In April 1996, Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital after suffering a seizure on a flight to St. Louis. Two-and-a-half years later, she suffered a much more serious seizure.

Ten years after capturing the admiration of America, while sleeping in her home in Mission Viejo, Cal., she died of suffocation during a severe epileptic seizure on Sept. 21, 1998. Florence Griffith Joyner was 38 years old. While questions resurfaced about drugs, the autopsy did not reveal any use of steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs in her system.

FloJo still owns the world records in both the 100 and 200 meters.

Source: ESPN Classic

 

Star Trek is a phenomenal classic Science fiction television series Tags: Star trek classic science fiction television series word life production feature blog

Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment franchise created by Gene Roddenberry and currently under the ownership of CBS and Paramount. Star Trek: The Original Series and its live action TV spin-off shows, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Enterprise as well as the Star Trek film series make up the main canon. There has also been Star Trek: The Animated Series.

Westerns such as Wagon Train, along with the Horatio Hornblower novels and Gulliver's Travels, inspired Roddenberry when he created the first Star Trek. It followed the interstellar adventures of James T. Kirk and the crew of an exploration vessel of a 23rd-century galactic "United Federation of Planets" — the Starship Enterprise. This first series now referred to as "The Original Series", debuted in 1966 and ran for three seasons on NBC. These adventures continued in the short-lived Star Trek: The Animated Series and six feature films. Four spin-off television series were eventually produced: Star Trek: The Next Generation, followed the crew of a new Starship Enterprise set a century after the original series; Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Voyager, set contemporaneously with The Next Generation; and Star Trek: Enterprise, set before the original series, in the early days of human interstellar travel. Four additional The Next Generation feature films were produced. In 2009, the film franchise underwent a relaunch with a prequel to the original series set in an alternate timeline titled simply Star Trek. This film featured a new cast portraying younger versions of the crew from the original Enterprise A sequel to this film, Star Trek Into Darkness, premiered on May 16, 2013.

Star Trek has been a cult phenomenon for decades.[1] Fans of the franchise are called Trekkies or Trekkers. The franchise spans a wide range of spin-offs including games, figurines, novels, toys, and comics. Star Trek had a themed attraction in Las Vegas which opened in 1998 and closed in September 2008. At least two museum exhibits of props travel the world. The series has its own full-fledged constructed language, Klingon. Several parodies have been made of Star Trek. Its fans, despite the end of Star Trek episodes on TV, have produced several fan productions to fill that void.

Star Trek is noted for its influence on the world outside of science fiction. It has been cited as an inspiration for several technological inventions such as the cell phone. Moreover, the show is noted for its progressive civil rights stances. The original series included one of television's first multiracial casts, and the first televised inter-racial kiss. Star Trek references can be found throughout popular culture from movies such as the submarine thriller Crimson Tide to the cartoon series South Park.

As early as 1964, Gene Roddenberry drafted a proposal for the science fiction series that would become Star Trek. Although he publicly marketed it as a Western in outer space—a so-called "Wagon Train to the Stars" (like the popular Western TV series)he privately told friends that he was modeling it on Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, intending each episode to act on two levels: as a suspenseful adventure story and as a morality tale.

Most Star Trek stories depict the adventures of humans and aliens who serve in Starfleet, the space-borne humanitarian and peacekeeping armada of the United Federation of Planets. The protagonists have altruistic values, and must apply these ideals to difficult dilemmas. Many of the conflicts and political dimensions of Star Trek represent allegories of contemporary cultural realities. Star Trek: The Original Series addressed issues of the 1960s, just as later spin-offs have reflected issues of their respective decades. Issues depicted in the various series include war and peace, the value of personal loyalty, authoritarianism, imperialism, class warfare, economics, racism, religion, human rights, sexism, feminism, and the role of technology. Roddenberry stated: "[By creating] a new world with new rules, I could make statements about sex, religion, Vietnam, politics, and intercontinental missiles. Indeed, we did make them on Star Trek: we were sending messages and fortunately they all got by the network."

Roddenberry intended the show to have a highly progressive political agenda reflective of the emerging counter-culture of the youth movement, though he was not fully forthcoming to the networks about this. He wanted Star Trek to show humanity what it might develop into, if only it would learn from the lessons of the past, most specifically by ending violence. An extreme example is the alien species, the Vulcans, who had a very violent past but learned to control their emotions. Roddenberry also gave Star Trek an anti-war message and depicted the United Federation of Planets as an ideal, optimistic version of the United Nations. His efforts were opposed by the network because of concerns over marketability, e.g., they opposed Roddenberry's insistence that the Enterprise have a racially diverse crew.

As early as 1964, Gene Roddenberry drafted a proposal for the science fiction series that would become Star Trek. Although he publicly marketed it as a Western in outer space—a so-called "Wagon Train to the Stars" (like the popular Western TV series)—he privately told friends that he was modeling it on Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, intending each episode to act on two levels: as a suspenseful adventure story and as a morality tale.

 Most Star Trek stories depict the adventures of humans and aliens who serve in Starfleet, the space-borne humanitarian and peacekeeping armada of the United Federation of Planets. The protagonists have altruistic values, and must apply these ideals to difficult dilemmas. Many of the conflicts and political dimensions of Star Trek represent allegories of contemporary cultural realities. Star Trek: The Original Series addressed issues of the 1960s, just as later spin-offs have reflected issues of their respective decades. Issues depicted in the various series include war and peace, the value of personal loyalty, authoritarianism, imperialism, class warfare, economics, racism, religion, human rights, sexism, feminism, and the role of technology.[5] Roddenberry stated: "[By creating] a new world with new rules, I could make statements about sex, religion, Vietnam, politics, and intercontinental missiles. Indeed, we did make them on Star Trek: we were sending messages and fortunately they all got by the network."

Roddenberry intended the show to have a highly progressive political agenda reflective of the emerging counter-culture of the youth movement, though he was not fully forthcoming to the networks about this. He wanted Star Trek to show humanity what it might develop into, if only it would learn from the lessons of the past, most specifically by ending violence. An extreme example is the alien species, the Vulcans, who had a very violent past but learned to control their emotions. Roddenberry also gave Star Trek an anti-war message and depicted the United Federation of Planets as an ideal, optimistic version of the United Nations. His efforts were opposed by the network because of concerns over marketability, e.g., they opposed Roddenberry's insistence that the Enterprise have a racially diverse crew.

Since 1967, hundreds of original novels, short stories, and television and movie adaptations have been published. The very first original Star Trek novel was Mission to Horatius by Mack Reynolds, which was published in hardcover by Whitman Books in 1968.

The first publisher of Star Trek fiction aimed at adult readers was Bantam Books. In 1970, James Blish wrote the first original Star Trek novel published by Bantam, Spock Must Die!. Pocket Books is currently the publisher of Star Trek novels.

Prolific Star Trek novelists include Peter David, Diane Carey, Keith R. A. DeCandido, J. M. Dillard, Diane Duane, Michael Jan Friedman, and Judith and Garfield Reeves-Stevens. Several actors and writers from the television series have also written books: William Shatner, and John de Lancie, Andrew J. Robinson, J. G. Hertzler, and Armin Shimerman have written or co-written books featuring their respective characters. Voyager producer Jeri Taylor wrote two novels featuring back story for Voyager characters, and screen authors David Gerrold, D. C. Fontana, and Melinda Snodgrass have penned books, as well.

Comics

Star Trek-based comics have been published almost continuously since 1967 by several companies including: Marvel, DC, Malibu, Wildstorm, and Gold Key. Tokyopop currently is publishing an anthology of Next Generation-based stories presented in the style of Japanese manga. As of 2006, IDW Publishing secured publishing rights to Star Trek comics and published a prequel to the 2009 film, Star Trek: Countdown. In 2012 they published Volume I of Star Trek - The Newspaper Strip featuring the work of Thomas Warkentin.

Games

The Star Trek franchise has numerous games in many different formats. Beginning in 1967 with a board game based on the original series and continuing through 2009 with online and DVD games, Star Trek games continue to be popular among fans.

Video games of the series are Star Trek: Legacy and Star Trek: Conquest. An MMORPG based on Star Trek called Star Trek Online was developed by Cryptic Studios and published by Perfect World. It is set in the TNG universe approximately 30 years after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis. The most recent video game, set in the new J. J. Abrams universe, was titled Star Trek.

On June 8, 2010, Wiz Kids Games, which is owned by NECA, announced that they are developing a Star Trek collectible miniatures game using the HeroClix game system.

Cultural impact

Prototype space shuttle Enterprise named after the fictional starship with Star Trek television cast members and creator Gene Roddenberry.

The Star Trek media franchise is a multi-billion dollar industry, currently owned by CBS. Gene Roddenberry sold Star Trek to NBC as a classic adventure drama; he pitched the show as "Wagon Train to the Stars" and as Horatio Hornblower in Space.[58] The opening line, "to boldly go where no man has gone before," was taken almost verbatim from a US White House booklet on space produced after the Sputnik flight in 1957. The central trio of Kirk, Spock, and McCoy was modeled on classical mythological storytelling.

Star Trek and its spin-offs have proven highly popular in syndication and are currently shown on TV stations worldwide. The show's cultural impact goes far beyond its longevity and profitability. Star Trek conventions have become popular among its fans, who call themselves "trekkies" or "trekkers". An entire subculture has grown up around the show which was documented in the film Trekkies. Star Trek was the highest-ranked cult show by TV Guide. The franchise has also garnered many comparisons of the Star Wars franchise being rivals in the science fiction genre with many fans and scholars.

The Star Trek franchise inspired some designers of technologies, such as the Palm PDA and the handheld mobile phone. Michael Jones, Chief technologist of Google Earth, has cited the tricorder's mapping capability as one inspiration in the development of Keyhole/Google Earth. It also brought teleportation to popular attention with its depiction of "matter-energy transport", with phrases such as famous misquoted "Beam me up, Scotty" entering the vernacular. In 1976, following a letter-writing campaign, NASA named its prototype space shuttle Enterprise, after the fictional starship. Later, the introductory sequence to Star Trek: Enterprise included footage of this shuttle which, along with images of a naval sailing vessel called the Enterprise, depicted the advancement of human transportation technology.

Beyond Star Trek's fictional innovations, its contributions to TV history included a multicultural and multiracial cast. While more common in subsequent years, in the 1960s it was controversial to feature an Enterprise crew that included a Japanese helmsman, a Russian navigator, a black female communications officer, and a Vulcan-Terran first officer. Captain Kirk's and Lt. Uhura's kiss, in the episode Plato's Stepchildren, was also daring, and is often mis-cited as being American television's first scripted, interracial kiss, even though several other interracial kisses predated this one.

Parodies

Early TV comedy sketch parodies of Star Trek included a famous sketch on Saturday Night Live titled "The Last Voyage of the Starship Enterprise", with John Belushi as Kirk, Chevy Chase as Spock and Dan Aykroyd as McCoy. In the 1980s, Saturday Night Live did a sketch with William Shatner reprising his Captain Kirk role in The Restaurant Enterprise, preceded by a sketch in which he played himself at a Trek convention angrily telling fans to "Get a Life", a phrase that has become part of Trek folklore. In Living Color continued the tradition in a sketch where Captain Kirk is played by a fellow Canadian Jim Carrey.

A feature-length film that indirectly parodies Star Trek is Galaxy Quest. This film is based on the premise that aliens monitoring the broadcast of an Earth-based TV series called Galaxy Quest, modeled heavily on Star Trek, believe that what they are seeing is real. Many Star Trek actors have been quoted saying that Galaxy Quest was a brilliant parody.

Star Trek has been blended with Gilbert and Sullivan at least twice. The North Toronto Players presented a Star Trek adaptation of Gilbert & Sullivan titled H.M.S. Starship Pinafore: The Next Generation in 1991 and an adaptation by Jon Mullich of Gilbert & Sullivan's H.M.S. Pinafore that sets the operetta in the world of Star Trek has played in Los Angeles and was attended by series luminaries Nichelle Nichols, D.C. Fontana and David Gerrold. A similar blend of Gilbert and Sullivan and Star Trek was presented as a benefit concert in San Francisco by the Lamplighters in 2009. The show was titled Star Drek: The Generation After That. It presented an original story with Gilbert and Sullivan melodies.

The new Doctor Who series has had several references to Star Trek. In The Empty Child and The Doctor Dances Rose introduces the Doctor to Captain Jack as Doctor Spock and uses the phrase "Give me some Spock" when she wants an explanation. In The Impossible Astronaut a woman meets an alien and asks if it's some sort of Star Trek mask.

 

Both The Simpsons and Futurama television series and others have had many individual episodes parodying Star Trek or with Trek allusions. An entire series of films and novels from Finland titled Star Wreck also parodies Star Trek.

Star Trek has been parodied in several non-English movies, including the German Traumschiff Surprise - Periode 1 which features a gay version of The Original Series bridge crew and a Turkish film that spoofs that same series' episode "The Man Trap" in one of the series of films based on the character Turist Ömer.

Notable fan fiction

Main article: Star Trek fan productions

The online fan-produced Star Trek: Phase II series is permitted by CBS and Paramount Pictures since no profit is being made from it. The son of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, Eugene Roddenberry Jr., has served as consulting producer, and several members the original series cast have given it their support.[83] Both actors and writers involved with official Star Trek have contributed. Actress Denise Crosby has played the grandmother of her Next Generation character, and both George Takei and Walter Koenig have played older versions of the same characters they played on Star Trek. The second episode, entitled "To Serve All My Days", was written by original series writer D.C. Fontana and other former Trek writers have contributed their talent.

The episode "World Enough and Time" was nominated for the prestigious Hugo award, competing against episodes of Doctor Who, Torchwood, and Battlestar Galactica.

As with other material available only online in the form of "webisodes", the Internet Movie Database lists this as a television series.

Awards and honors

Of the various science fiction awards for drama, only the Hugo Award dates back as far as the original series. In 1968, all five nominees for a Hugo Award were individual episodes of Star Trek, as were three of the five nominees in 1967.[Note 12] The only Star Trek series to not get even a Hugo nomination are the animated series and Voyager, though only the original series and Next Generation ever won the award. No Star Trek featured film has ever won a Hugo, though a few were nominated. In 2008, the fan made episode of Star Trek: New Voyages entitled "World Enough and Time" was nominated for the Hugo for Best Short Drama.[88]

The two Star Trek series to win multiple Saturn awards during their run were The Next Generation (twice winning for best television series) and Voyager (twice winning for best actress - Kate Mulgrew and Jeri Ryan).[Note 13] The original series retroactively won a Saturn Award for best DVD release. Several Star Trek films have won Saturns including categories such as best actor, actress, director, costume design, and special effects. However, Star Trek has never won a Saturn for best make-up.[89]

As for non science fiction specific awards, the Star Trek series has won 31 Emmy Awards.[90] The eleventh Star Trek film won the 2009 Academy Award for Best Makeup, the franchise's first Academy Award.[91]

Corporate ownership

At Star Trek's creation, Norway Productions, Roddenberry's production company, shared ownership with Desilu Productions and, after Gulf+Western acquired Desilu in 1967, with Paramount Pictures, the conglomerate's film studio. Paramount did not want to own the unsuccessful show; net profit was to be shared between Norway, Desilu/Paramount, Shatner, and NBC but Star Trek lost money, and the studio did not expect to syndicate it. In 1970 Paramount offered to sell all rights to Star Trek to Roddenberry, but he could not afford the $150,000 ($902,000 today) price.[92]:218,220

In 1989 Gulf+Western renamed itself as Paramount Communications, and in 1994 merged with Viacom. 218 In 2005 Viacom divided into CBS Corporation, whose CBS Television Studios subsidiary retained the Star Trek brand, and Viacom, whose Paramount Pictures subsidiary retained the Star Trek film library and rights to make additional films, along with video distribution rights to the TV series on behalf of CBS.

Source: Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Trek

MUSIC IS JUST NOT MUSIC UNLESS YOU PUT YOUR SOUL INTO IT Tags: ill-iteracy's star city va underground hip hop music word life production

         Each born in Roanoke "Star City",VA. iLL-iteracy's members developed affinities for music early in their lives. Whether it was jam sessions in the basement or rocking the crowd at their high school football games, their talent and love for all things instrumental was obvious.  The group was officially formed circa 1998, but have known each other since about the age of six.  Beginning with tee-ball, the members had a close friendship with each other that only seemed to grow stronger as time went by.  This is a fact that many people find intriguing, as not too many people tend to have one best friend for so long, let alone an entourage of them.

        

        The group was formed in the Dudley Basement, which was only a half mile away from William Fleming High School where they all attended.  Honors classes, magnet programs, and an enthusiastic approach to learning undoubtedly had an effect on their appreciation for the art of music.  After school, each of the members would gather around a computer, a base-model plastic computer microphone, and a technologically inferior recording program just for kicks.  There was no mission in mind; no money-making scheme...  There was just music.

        The members of iLL-iteracy are Scott Dudley - "Chris Prythm", Kirk Dudley - "Speek Eazy", Corey English - "WiLL Spitwell", and George Trent -   "Young Observe". Now operating under the witty moniker "iLL-iteracy,"   they site influences such as God, each other, Roanoke City, prayerful mothers, scornful fathers, the loss of loved ones, and all the typical conditions that define an inner-city.  Their sound is inspirational but far from ignorantly blissful and their musical arsenal ranges from upbeat anthems to thought provoking, more conscious selections.


    'iLL-it' shows no indication of slowing down nor do they appear to be fatigued in spite of working day-jobs, earning college degrees, and managing families.  The phrase "due time" undoubtedly comes to mind when you factor in that the team writes, records and mixes all their own music. The group's determination shines through more recent ventures including "iLL-it Beatz," an integral section of the official website (www.iLL-it.com) that was created from beginning to end by Speek Eazy and Chris Prythm. "iLL-it Beatz" showcases and makes available quality, custom-fitted tracks for other artists to use in further sharpening of their respective crafts.  In an industry where 'one-hit-wonders' are prevalent, the individuals that make up iLL-iteracy are bound and determined to be anything but.  They continue to develop their skills on both the artist/producer and executive sides of the business in preparation for the opportunity that most never get. But that's the motivation that pushes them harder and fuels the hunger that so many others lack. A group holding no limits,  versatile with the ability to mesh with any genre, not following 'hype' or others, just the love and passion to make riLL music.

Ill-iteracy's Website: www.ill-it.com

Featured Artist of the Week-Reggae Star Glenn Middleton Tags: glenn middleton reggae star word life production rising star records

Glenn Middleton was born during the soulful era in the country of Belize. In 1969 he migrated to Los Angeles, the following year he moved to Brooklyn New York to pursue his studies in music art. In 1978 he returned to Los Angeles where he became the manager of a night club and the overseer of an R&B band. It was during that time he befriend singer/songwriter Shirley Garden who was singing with Stevie Wonder, a great singer/songwriter himself.  Glenn discovered his hidden talent as a songwriter when Shirley Garden saw a rough cut in a diamond and polished up his skills.

Glenn Currently resides in Minnesota pursing his ambitions as a successful songwriter. His Music is a beautiful glimpse into the culture of Reggae music with songs is highly layered with themes of love and change, and illustrates his personal experience in travel and relationship.  As a songwriter it’s really been a natural way for him to process his life.  His goal is to be truthful; to get down to the root of whatever he writes about.  The sincere content of his music makes it incredibly relatable.

His prophetic and romantic lyrics, along with his harmonic phasing, make him a very creative songwriter.  His style is characterized as a cross between Bob Marley and Ottis Redding, and exemplifies a message of love, unity and social responsibility in this time.  He is definitely ready to make his mark in the Industry.

Press Release:

The Internet and music industry are doing a disservice musicians.  In the world of Reggae music very few remain true and totally committed consciously and spiritually to the music.

Rising Star Records is an independent record label based in Minnesota, and has released its debut reggae CD entitled, A BLESSING OF LOVE, a beautiful glimpse into the culture of reggae music that gives us hope to emancipate ourselves from the tradition way of Babylon, which is not readily available on the commercial market.  The album is consisting of various artists, including “Lloyd Bread” Macdonald of the Wailing Souls who sings the title track.

Rising Star Records founder and President Glenn Middleton is an environment conscious person and as a songwriter, is devoted to bring world listeners, music that is motivating and inspirational, much like the folk-influence songwriting of Bob Marley.  His songs highly layered with theme of love and change, illustrates his personal experience in travel and relationship. His goal is to be truthful; to get down to the roots of whatever he writes about. The sincere content of his music makes it incredibly relatable.

The album is extremely well produced; the instrumental arrangements are well engineered and catchy, each element of the music mixed perfectly to create a masterpiece and is performed by socially conscious musicians who use their music as a vehicle for message. The album receives its blessing from legendary roots reggae guitarist Tony Chin, drummer Santa Davis, and arranger/producer Michael Hyde.

Rising Star Records hope that by spreading positive vibes it can help listeners to find the quality of music they desire.

Available on: iTunes, Amazon, CD Baby, and Digstation.  www.risingstarsrecords.org


 

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