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How Is Anemia Treated? Tags: anemia treated foods word life production new quality entertainment featured blog health mental wellness

Treatment for anemia depends on the type, cause, and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes or supplements, medicines, or procedures.

Goals of Treatment

The goal of treatment is to increase the amount of oxygen that your blood can carry. This is done by raising the red blood cell count and/or hemoglobin level. (Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body.)

Another goal is to treat the underlying condition or cause of the anemia.

Dietary Changes and Supplements

Low levels of vitamins or iron in the body can cause some types of anemia. These low levels may be due to poor diet or certain diseases or conditions.

To raise your vitamin or iron level, your doctor may ask you to change your diet or take vitamin or iron supplements. Common vitamin supplements are vitamin B12 and folic acid (folate). Vitamin C sometimes is given to help the body absorb iron.

Iron

Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Your body can more easily absorb iron from meats than from vegetables or other foods. To treat your anemia, your doctor may suggest eating more meat—especially red meat (such as beef or liver), as well as chicken, turkey, pork, fish, and shellfish.

Nonmeat foods that are good sources of iron include:

  • Spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables
  • Tofu 
  • Peas; lentils; white, red, and baked beans; soybeans; and chickpeas
  • Dried fruits, such as prunes, raisins, and apricots
  • Prune juice
  • Iron-fortified cereals and breads

You can look at the Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods to find out how much iron the items contain. The amount is given as a percentage of the total amount of iron you need every day.

Iron also is available as a supplement. It's usually combined with multivitamins and other minerals that help your body absorb iron.

Doctors may recommend iron supplements for premature infants and infants who are fed breast milk only or formula that isn't fortified with iron.

Large amounts of iron can be harmful, so take iron supplements only as your doctor prescribes.

Vitamin B12

Low levels of vitamin B12 can lead to pernicious anemia. This type of anemia often is treated with vitamin B12 supplements.

Good food sources of vitamin B12 include:

  • Breakfast cereals with added vitamin B12
  • Meats such as beef, liver, poultry, and fish
  • Eggs and dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, and cheese)
  • Foods fortified with vitamin B12, such as soy-based beverages and vegetarian burgers

Folic Acid

Folic acid (folate) is a form of vitamin B that's found in foods. Your body needs folic acid to make and maintain new cells. Folic acid also is very important for pregnant women. It helps them avoid anemia and promotes healthy growth of the fetus.

Good sources of folic acid include:

  • Bread, pasta, and rice with added folic acid
  • Spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables
  • Black-eyed peas and dried beans
  • Beef liver
  • Eggs
  • Bananas, oranges, orange juice, and some other fruits and juices

Vitamin C

Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron. Good sources of vitamin C are vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. Fresh and frozen fruits, vegetables, and juices usually have more vitamin C than canned ones.

If you're taking medicines, ask your doctor or pharmacist whether you can eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice. This fruit can affect the strength of a few medicines and how well they work.

Other fruits rich in vitamin C include kiwi fruit, strawberries, and cantaloupes.

Vegetables rich in vitamin C include broccoli, peppers, Brussels sprouts, tomatoes, cabbage, potatoes, and leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach.

Medicines

Your doctor may prescribe medicines to increase the number of red blood cells your body makes or to treat an underlying cause of anemia. Some of these medicines include:

  • Antibiotics to treat infections.
  • Hormones to treat heavy menstrual bleeding in teenaged and adult women.
  • A man-made version of erythropoietin to stimulate your body to make more red blood cells. This hormone has some risks. You and your doctor will decide whether the benefits of this treatment outweigh the risks.
  • Medicines to prevent the body's immune system from destroying its own red blood cells.
  • Chelation (ke-LAY-shun) therapy for lead poisoning. Chelation therapy is used mainly in children. This is because children who have iron-deficiency anemia are at increased risk of lead poisoning.

Procedures

If your anemia is severe, you may need a medical procedure to treat it. Procedures include blood transfusions and blood and marrow stem cell transplants.

Blood Transfusion

A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood is given to you through an intravenous (IV) line in one of your blood vessels. Transfusions require careful matching of donated blood with the recipient's blood.

For more information, go to the Diseases and Conditions Index Blood Transfusion article.

Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant

A blood and marrow stem cell transplant replaces your faulty stem cells with healthy ones from another person (a donor). Stem cells are found in the bone marrow. They develop into red and white blood cells and platelets.

During the transplant, which is like a blood transfusion, you get donated stem cells through a tube placed in a vein in your chest. Once the stem cells are in your body, they travel to your bone marrow and begin making new blood cells.

For more information, go to the Diseases and Conditions Index Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant article.

Surgery

If you have serious or life-threatening bleeding that's causing anemia, you may need surgery. For example, you may need surgery to control ongoing bleeding due to a stomach ulcer or colon cancer.

If your body is destroying red blood cells at a high rate, you may need to have your spleen removed. The spleen is an organ that removes wornout red blood cells from the body. An enlarged or diseased spleen may remove more red blood cells than normal, causing anemia.

How Can Anemia Be Prevented?

You may be able to prevent repeat episodes of some types of anemia, especially those caused by lack of iron or vitamins. Dietary changes or supplements can prevent these types of anemia from occurring again.

Treating anemia's underlying cause may prevent the condition (or prevent repeat episodes). For example, if medicine is causing your anemia, your doctor may prescribe another type of medicine.

To prevent your anemia from getting worse, tell your doctor about all of your signs and symptoms. Talk with your doctor about the tests you may need and follow your treatment plan.

You can't prevent some types of inherited anemia, such as sickle cell anemia. If you have an inherited anemia, talk with your doctor about treatment and ongoing care.


Source: National Heart, Lung, & Blood Institute

Celebrating the Life of Theodore "Teddy" Wilson Tags: celebrating life theodore teddy wilson word life production new quality entertainment featured blog

Theodore "Teddy" Wilson (December 10, 1943 – July 21, 1991) first appeared as the delivery agent that delivers Fred a telegram inviting him to a bogus junk man convention in Hawaii in Episode one of "Hawaiian Connection" aired on September 24, 1976. Later, he appeared as Phil Wheeler, an old army buddy of Fred's who bought the Sanford and Son Salvage and the Sanford Arms, in the failed 1977 NBC-TV spinoff comedy series titled The Sanford Arms. Teddy was probably best known for his recurring role as Sweet Daddy Williams on the CBS-TV sitcom series Good Times.

Born in New York City, Teddy made his acting debut in the blaxploitation film, Cotton Comes to Harlem, along with Sanford and Son series star Redd Foxx. He would go on to appear in several blaxploitation films of the era. In addition to films, Wilson also landed roles in several popular television shows. Wilson portrayed Earl the postman and barber in the series That's My Mama. He also played several characters in the 1970s sitcom What's Happening!!, including the role of Al Dunbar in a popular two-part episode. In the conclusion of the two-part episode, Wilson's character gets arrested for bootlegging a Doobie Brothers concert.[1][2]

In 1977, Wilson starred in the short-lived sitcom The Sanford Arms, a spin-off of Sanford and Son. After the series was canceled, Wilson made various guest appearances in episodes of The White Shadow (he also wrote a 1980 episode), Enos, Gimme a Break!, The Golden Girls, and What's Happening Now. In 1986, he had a recurring role on another short-lived series, The Redd Foxx Show.

Wilson continued to work steadily throughout the late 1980s and 1990s appearing in Alien Nation, CBS-TV's Dallas, ABC-TV's Family Matters, Tales from the Crypt, Gabriel's Fire, Mama's Family, and NBC-TV's Quantum Leap. He was also featured in films The Hunter (1980), Blake Edwards' A Fine Mess (1986) and That;s Life! (1986). Wilson made his last onscreen appearance in Blood in Blood Out, a 1993 crime drama series released after his death.

In 1980, Wilson married actress Joan Pringle. The couple had two children. On July 21, 1991, Wilson died of a stroke at the age of 47 in Los Angeles, California.

Source: Wiki

The Art of Soul-Teddy Pendergrass
Category: The Art of Soul
Tags: srt soul teddy pendergrass word life production feature blog

Teddy Pendergrass started singing gospel music in Philadelphia churches, becoming an ordained minister at ten years old. While attending public school, he sang in the citywide McIntyre Elementary School Choir and in the All-City Stetson Junior High School Choir. A self-taught drummer, Pendergrass had a teen pop vocal group when he was 15. By his late teens, Pendergrass was a drummer for local vocal group the Cadillacs.

To Be True

In the late '60s, the Cadillacs merged with another more established group, Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes. In 1970, when the Blue Notes broke up, Melvin, now aware of Pendergrass' vocal prowess, asked him to take the lead singer spot. It's no secret that Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff wanted Marvin Junior of the Dells for their Philadelphia International Records roster. Since the Dells were signed to Chess, they were unavailable. When the gruff'n'ready vocals of Pendergrass came their way, they eagerly signed the group. Beginning with "I Miss You," a steady stream of hit singles flowed from the collaboration of Pendergrass and Gamble & Huff: "If You Don't Know Me by Now," "The Love I Lost," "Bad Luck," "Wake Up Everybody" (number one R&B for two weeks in 1976), and two gold albums, To Be True and Wake Up Everybody.

Unfortunately, the more success the group had, the more friction developed between Melvin and Pendergrass. Despite the revised billing of the group, Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes featuring Theodore Pendergrass, Pendergrass felt that he wasn't getting enough recognition. Around 1976, Pendergrass left Melvin's Blue Notes and formed his own Blue Notes, featuring Teddy Pendergrass. Briefly, there was some confusion as to which Blue Notes were which. The resolution came when Pendergrass disbanded his Blue Notes in favor of a solo career and Melvin's group signed a recording contract with Source Records, distributed through ABC Records, scoring a hit with "I Want to Be Your Lover."

Teddy Pendergrass

Pendergrass signed a new contract with Philadelphia International Records in late 1976/early 1977. He burst back on the scene with Teddy Pendergrass, a platinum solo debut that included the top-notch singles "I Don't Love You Anymore," "You Can't Hide from Yourself," and "The More I Get the More I Want." Around this time, Pendergrass began to institute his infamous "Ladies Only" concerts. His next three albums went gold or platinum: Life Is a Song Worth Singing (1978), Teddy (1979), and Teddy Live (Coast to Coast). The hit single "Close the Door" was used in the film Soup for One, where Pendergrass had a small role.

TP

The singer received several Grammy nominations during 1977 and 1978, Billboard's 1977 Pop Album New Artist Award, an American Music Award for best R&B performer of 1978, and awards from Ebony magazine and the NAACP. He was also in consideration for the lead in the movie biopic The Otis Redding Story. The '70s ended, but Pendergrass kept racking up the hits. TP, his fifth solo album, went platinum in the summer of 1980 off the singles "Turn Off the Lights," "Come Go with Me," "Shout and Scream," "It's You I Love," and "Can't We Try." It's Time for Love gave Pendergrass another gold album in summer 1981, which included the hit singles "Love TKO" and "I Can't Live Without Your Love."

Love Language

A 1982 car accident left Pendergrass paralyzed from the waist down and wheelchair-bound. After almost a year of physical therapy and counseling, Pendergrass returned to the recording scene, signing a contract with Elektra/Asylum in 1983. His ninth solo album and Elektra/Asylum debut, Love Language went gold the spring of 1984. Philadelphia International issued two albums of unreleased tracks, This One's for You (1982) and Heaven Only Knows (1983). Other albums included Workin' It Back (1985), Joy (1988, whose title track went to number one R&B for two weeks), and Little More Magic (1993). The latter half of the '90s found Pendergrass recording for the Surefire/Wind Up label. Truly Blessed, the name of an 1991 Elektra album, is also the title of the autobiography Pendergrass co-authored with Patricia Romanowski. Apart from an appearance at a 2007 ceremony held in his honor, Pendergrass spent his later years away from the spotlight. He had difficulty recovering from colon cancer surgery and passed away on January 13, 2010.

Source: AllMusic

Dorinda Clark-Cole is an incredible anointed gift to ministry Tags: dorinda clark cole anointed gift ministry true worshippers word life production feature blog

She has been called “the Rose of Gospel,” “the church girl,” and “evangelist” but more than anything else, three time Grammy award winner Dorinda Clark Cole is a fired up sister for Christ and one of the most gifted vocalists in the music world today.

Her Story

The second from the youngest of The Clark Sisters, Dorinda attributes her fiery, convicting singing style to her mother, Dr. Mattie Moss-Clark, who saw the gift of singing and preaching in her at an early age. Back in the 1960’s and 70’s, when other children their age were playing outside, Dorinda and her sisters had to work on their now famous familial harmonies.  She says, “We made a lot of sacrifices.  My mom was a stickler for making sure we rehearsed before we went out to perform.  If we had an engagement on a Saturday or Sunday, during the week she would call us in and say, ‘Hey ya’ll I need you to come in here and rehearse.’ That’s when mom started really putting the discipline in us.  She would say, ‘Karen, I want you to take that microphone and sing this note…and now Dorinda, I want you to talk a little bit.’ When Karen the youngest turned five we started recording. She saw the gifts and talents within us and started shaping and molding us.  She taught us discipline along with how to use our gifts. We still have those gifts today.  It was all in preparation for what we do today as recording artists, writers and producers.” The gift of talking that Dorinda’s mother saw in her as a little girl has evolved into a phenomenal preaching ministry that goes hand in hand with her singing ministry. “I can’t get around the both of them; I can’t leave the stage without saying something…and even when I preach, I can’t leave without singing a line of something,” she laughs.Today this gift has made room for her to serve in ministry to God's glory, while juggling her life as a wife, mother of two; Nikkia and Greg Jr. and grandmother of one DJ.

Career

Dorinda has been evangelizing and juggling hundreds of speaking engagements annually for over twenty years, along with her singing career and being a wife and mother. She ministers nationally as well as internationally in countries such as England, Japan, Germany, France, Korea and South Africa. She made history in South Africa, having been the first woman to minister in the pulpit to over 4,000 people. Dr. Cole has followed in her mother's footstep by having several leadership roles in the International Church of God in Christ. She currently serves as Assistant to the Elect Lady of the Evangelism Department of the Church. She is also member and administrator at the Greater Emmanuel Institutional Church of God in Christ under the leadership of Bishop J. Drew Sheard.

And to add to that, she is the new host of TCT Network’s Dorinda Show, co-host of TCT’s Celebrate on the Road, former Stellar Awards host, guest judge on Verizon's "How Sweet The Sound" national televised competition, the former spokes model for Donna Vinci Clothing and her “Rose Collection” is now distributed by Terra Mina Fashions. She has since partnered with MR. SONG, an immaculate fashion designer of Detroit, in creating The Bloom Collection, a couture collection of hat adorning accessories. She is also the Founder and CEO of Lifeline Productions Inc., which holds an annual Singers & Musicians Conference. In September 2004 she received an honorary Doctorate of Divinity from Mt. Carmel Theological Seminary of Fresno, CA.

Music

In June 2002 Dorinda released her self-titled album Dorinda Clark- Cole on Gospo Centric Records/Zomba Label Group. This was followed in August 2005 by her sophomore album The Rose of Gospel on Gospo Centric Records/Zomba Label Group. The album debuted in Billboard’s Top 5 and garnered a Grammy Nomination for the Best Traditional Soul Gospel album & won 2007 and 2009 Stellar Award for the “Best Female Artist of The Year”. Her third project Take It Back was released in April 2008 on Gospo Centric Records/ Zomba Label Group. Her latest release, an EP Album titled In the Face of Change, included BAMM, which was a “Verizon Select”. In early spring of 2009,  Dorinda received the honor of performing Nothing but the Truth for the Sojourner Truth unveiling on Capitol Hill for 1st Lady Michelle Obama and other officials. Dorinda's solo career  continues to progress with a newly established deal with Light Records in 2010.

As a member of the world renowned Clark Sisters, Dr. Cole won three Grammys in 2008. Live - One Last Time won the Best Traditional Gospel Album. Its album track "Blessed & Highly Favored" won the Best Gospel Performance as well as the individual Best Gospel Song. With the group she appeared nationally on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, ABC's "The View", Bobby Jones Gospel, Lift Every Voice, Gospel Superfest, TBN’s Praise the Lord, The Stellar Award and The Lady of Soul Awards.

Testimony

However, she hasn’t always been at such a joyous place in her life. Dorinda was once a wounded soul who contemplated suicide and now testifies about that very trying time in her life. She recounts, “At that time my mother was not with me to help me get through that rough time. We were always dependent on our mom because she was always there… I didn’t understand why it was happening to me…It was very devastating.  And it caused me to go into a state of depression…I just couldn’t take it anymore and I got into my car and I began to drive to the river.  I was about to drive my car off the bridge. And while I was right there…the enemy was speaking to me, so I had a war going on. I began to drive and accelerate up to 80 miles per hour. God spoke to me just as plain as day and said, ‘Dorinda, are you going to let everything that has been invested in you go down the drain?’ And when I heard God’s voice, I began to take my foot off the accelerator and the car started coasting right to the bridge.  And the Lord whispered to me and said, ‘Peace be unto you.’  And that’s when I grabbed the steering wheel and I said, Lord I thank you. I began to weep and cry.  So if it had not been for God keeping me, right then I would have been doomed and consumed. I want it to reach those who are strung out on drugs.  I want them to be able to hand it over to other drug abusers and say listen to it and have it bless their lives.”

Source: Official Website: http://www.dorindaclarkcole.net/dorinda.html

One of the most gifted soul singers of all time-Al Green is a True Legend Tags: al green gigted soul singers.music hall fame word life production feature blog

With his incomparable voice, full of falsetto swoops and nuanced turns of phrase, Al Green rose to prominence in the Seventies. One of the most gifted purveyors of soul music, Green has sold more than 20 million records. During 1972 and 1973, he placed six consecutive singles in the Top 10: “Let’s Stay Together,” “Look What You Done for Me,” “I’m Still in Love With You,” “You Ought to Be With Me,” “Call Me” and “Here I Am (Come and Take Me).” “Let’s Stay Together” topped the pop chart for one week and the R&B charts for nine; it was also revived with great success by Tina Turner in 1984.  In terms of popularity and artistry, Green was the top male soul singer in the world, voluntarily ending his reign with a move from secular to gospel music in 1979.

Beyond his chart-making abilities, Green set a new standard for soul music and essentially created a new kind of soul – one that combined the gritty, down-home sensibility of the Memphis based Stax-Volt sound with the polished, sweeter delivery of Motown. Over a fat, funky bottom, Green’s subtle and inventive voice would soar into falsetto range with beguiling ease. His finest recordings showcase a penchant for jazzy filigree and soulful possession rivaled by the likes of Marvin Gaye and Aretha Franklin. They also are the products of teamwork, as Green benefited immensely from a longstanding association with producer Willie Mitchell and the house band at Hi Records.

Green was born on an Arkansas farm in 1946 and grew up in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He sang gospel with the Greene Brothers, a family quartet, and belonged to the Creations and the Soul Mates in the Sixties. In 1967, Al Green and the Soul Mates had a Number Five R&B hit with “Back Up Train.” In terms of influences, “I was raised on the sound of Sam Cooke and the Soul Stirrers,” Green has said. A fateful crossing of paths between Green and Willie Mitchell in Texas, where both were performing, resulted in Green’s signing to Memphis-based Hi Records in 1969. Mitchell produced Green’s recordings and co-wrote material with him for the next eight years. It was a fruitful association that yielded high-quality albums (such as I’m Still in Love With You and Call Me), as well as 13 Top 40 hits that helped keep the sound of soul pure and alive in the Seventies.

Mitchell cut Green’s groove-oriented records at his Royal Recording Studio, a converted movie theater in downtown Memphis. Essential components of Green and Mitchell’s mix of silky ballads and bouncy funk included the Hi Records studio band: guitarist Mabon “Teenie” Hodges, bassist Leroy Hodges, keyboardist Charles Hodges and drummer Howard Grimes. In addition, drummer Al Jackson (of Booker T. and the M.G.’s) co-wrote and played on many of Green’s biggest hits. Strings, horns and backup singers added to the intricate tapestry. But it was Green’s light, skillful touch as a vocalist that made it all work so well.

Green’s breakthrough came in 1971 with “Tired of Being Alone” (Number Seven R&B, Number 11 pop). A slew of hits followed, keeping Green in the Top 40 (and often the Top 10) through 1976. His consistent quality and flawless phrasing prompted music critic Robert Christgau to pronounce him among “the half dozen prime geniuses of soul.” His peak work as an R&B master is contained on a string of hit-filled albums released in the early Seventies: Al Green Gets Next to You (1971), I’m Still In Love With You (1972), Let’s Stay Together (1972), Call Me (1973) and Livin’ for You (1973).

With The Belle Album (1977), Green made an overt turn toward religious themes. The album was self-produced, as Mitchell amicably parted ways with Green over his turn to gospel. The 12th album of his career, it was “the most important release of my life,” according to Green in his autobiography, Take Me to the River. He elaborated: “God had called me to a higher place, turned me away from earthly to heavenly love, and while it hurt to say it, I had to leave the sensual for the spiritual.”

During the Eighties, Green recorded inspirational music for the Myrrh label while serving as pastor at a church he founded. The Nineties found him returning to his soul roots from time to time, yet to this day he remains primarily a singer and preacher of the gospel. On most Sundays, Green occupies the pulpit at Full Gospel Tabernacle Church on Hale Road in Memphis. The public is welcome to witness Green’s sermons, which are no less full of fire and feeling than the flood of singles that set the standard for soul in the Seventies.

Source: Official Website: http://rockhall.com/inductees/al-green/bio/

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