Tagged with "wilson"
Celebrating the Life of Theodore "Teddy" Wilson Tags: celebrating life theodore teddy wilson word life production new quality entertainment featured blog

Theodore "Teddy" Wilson (December 10, 1943 – July 21, 1991) first appeared as the delivery agent that delivers Fred a telegram inviting him to a bogus junk man convention in Hawaii in Episode one of "Hawaiian Connection" aired on September 24, 1976. Later, he appeared as Phil Wheeler, an old army buddy of Fred's who bought the Sanford and Son Salvage and the Sanford Arms, in the failed 1977 NBC-TV spinoff comedy series titled The Sanford Arms. Teddy was probably best known for his recurring role as Sweet Daddy Williams on the CBS-TV sitcom series Good Times.

Born in New York City, Teddy made his acting debut in the blaxploitation film, Cotton Comes to Harlem, along with Sanford and Son series star Redd Foxx. He would go on to appear in several blaxploitation films of the era. In addition to films, Wilson also landed roles in several popular television shows. Wilson portrayed Earl the postman and barber in the series That's My Mama. He also played several characters in the 1970s sitcom What's Happening!!, including the role of Al Dunbar in a popular two-part episode. In the conclusion of the two-part episode, Wilson's character gets arrested for bootlegging a Doobie Brothers concert.[1][2]

In 1977, Wilson starred in the short-lived sitcom The Sanford Arms, a spin-off of Sanford and Son. After the series was canceled, Wilson made various guest appearances in episodes of The White Shadow (he also wrote a 1980 episode), Enos, Gimme a Break!, The Golden Girls, and What's Happening Now. In 1986, he had a recurring role on another short-lived series, The Redd Foxx Show.

Wilson continued to work steadily throughout the late 1980s and 1990s appearing in Alien Nation, CBS-TV's Dallas, ABC-TV's Family Matters, Tales from the Crypt, Gabriel's Fire, Mama's Family, and NBC-TV's Quantum Leap. He was also featured in films The Hunter (1980), Blake Edwards' A Fine Mess (1986) and That;s Life! (1986). Wilson made his last onscreen appearance in Blood in Blood Out, a 1993 crime drama series released after his death.

In 1980, Wilson married actress Joan Pringle. The couple had two children. On July 21, 1991, Wilson died of a stroke at the age of 47 in Los Angeles, California.

Source: Wiki

In honor of those we've lost, let's celebrate the life of Ben Wilson Tags: honor lost loved ones ben wilson high school basketball legend word life production feature

At the start of the 1983-84 basketball season one thing was clear - Lowell Hamilton was not only Chicago’s top player but one of the nation's top 20 prospects in the 1985 recruiting class. But Ben Wilson would soon surpass Hamilton's glory by becoming Chicago's first to be named the nation’s top recruit.

You can't really blame anyone for sleeping on Wilson. It was only two years prior when he played junior varsity as a freshman, and while he had a solid sophomore year his numbers were modest. Yet it was during this time that things began to take shape for the 6-8 small forward. He adjusted into his quickly growing body while retaining passing and ball handling ability from his days as a guard. Word soon got out about the budding talent and the crazed basketball city of Chicago quickly embraced its newfound native son.

Wilson did not disappoint as he led Simeon High to the state championship with a 30-1 record and success did not stop there. He was invited to attend the prestigious Nike All-American camp where his versatility and feel for the game led many recruiting observers and head coaches to label Wilson the top player in the nation.

Heading into his senior year Wilson was on top of the basketball world. Simeon was a lock to repeat as State champs with Wilson, which became even more assured when he convinced his childhood friend and future NBA player, Nick Anderson, to transfer from Prosser High School.

Illinois, DePaul, and Indiana waited with baited breath to hear if Wilson would select their program. At 17 years-old he was also a new father to a baby boy. His future seemed all but set - just a few years in college before cashing in on the NBA.

The Problem

It was a warm November day; the kind that reminds you of spring. Wilson was just a few days from playing the first game of his much anticipated senior year. He and his high school sweetheart, Jetun Rush, decided to take a walk a few blocks from Simeon's campus. No one would have guessed that the events to unfold on this beautiful day would result in Wilson's murder.

Billy Moore and Omar Dixon were freshmen at Calumet High School looking for someone to pick a fight with. On the streets many youth look for ways to build up their reputation - a means of solidifying their "credentials" to intimidate enemies or strengthen alliances. The pair deliberately took up the entire sidewalk as Wilson and his girlfriend approached. He walked between them and accidentally bumped one of the boys. Wilson immediately excused himself but his so-called act of disrespect angered the two youths. Moore brandished a .22 caliber gun and attempted to rob Wilson but, encouraged by Dixon, went on to shoot Wilson in the chest after he refused to hand over his money.

The thugs ran off leaving their victim slumped against a metal fence. Wilson was rushed to St. Bernard Hospital where it was determined that the small bullet did a huge amount of damage as it pierced his liver and aorta. The next day doctors advised Wilson's parents of his grave condition. He was removed from life support and passed away.

Conclusion

The explosion of publicity and public anger over the event made gang arrests more frequent. Billy Moore was sentenced to 40 years for the murder of Ben Wilson while his accomplice, Omar Dixon, was sentenced to 30 years in prison.

It was not only Wilson's athletic ability that caused him to be liked by his peers. Everyone enjoyed his humble and charismatic spark. His wake lasted 12 hours and was attended by more than 10,000 people.

Wilson left behind a legacy as his life became a symbol of hope among Chicago youth. After graduation his best friend, Nick Anderson, wore Wilson's number 25 at Illinois in his honor. Simeon head coach Bob Hambric decided to follow Anderson’s lead and brought Wilson's number out of retirement with the opening the school’s new gym named after its slain star. Since then only the program’s top players have had the privilege of wearing the #25 jersey. This honor has been held by fellow draftees and Simeon alums Deon Thomas and Derrick Rose.

How good was Ben Wilson? It’s hard to project how far his talent would have taken him but former Chicago players and respected coaches from across the country spoke highly of the former prospect. The comparisons may be hard to grasp but have withstood the test of time. Wilson has been described as Magic Johnson with a jumpshot and Kevin Garnett with a better handle and perimeter game. In his 1985 recruiting class he was perceived to be better than Glen Rice, Danny Ferry, Sean Elliott, Pervis Ellison, Rod Strickland and Roy Marble - all who went on to have NBA careers.

The Draft Review honors Ben Wilson for his high school accomplishments and recognizes him as a 1989 Honorable Draftee.

Source: The Draft Review

RSS
Spread the word
Search

This website is powered by Spruz